CARDIOVASCULAR HORIZON SCANNING Volume 9 Issue 5

May 18, 2017

People who are ‘healthy’ obese are at risk of heart disease

May 18, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that so called ‘metabolically healthy’ obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure or stroke, than normal weight people.

The study, presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO), examined whether the risk of developing cardiovascular conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure, was different for normal weight people with no metabolic conditions or people with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


Low-gluten diet linked to heart attack risk

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Gluten-free diet can do more harm than good for people without coeliac disease,” The Independent reports, as a new study found that the “trendy gluten-free diets loved by Gwyneth Paltrow and Russell Crowe may increase the risk of heart disease”.  The current study followed more than 100,000 people from 1986 to 2012, assessing their diets and whether they had heart attacks during that time. These people did not have heart disease at the start of the study, and importantly did not have coeliac disease.

Overall, it found that once other risk factors were taken into account, people’s consumption of gluten was not related to their risk of heart attack. However, further analyses suggested that lower consumption of gluten specifically from whole grains (wheat, barley and rye) was associated with increased heart attack risk compared to higher consumption from these sources.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices            


Ibuprofen linked to increased risk of heart attacks

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Researchers looked at data from 446,763 people and found some evidence that all commonly-used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) appear to increase the risk of heart attack, and that the risk rises in the first week of use. The study found the risk was highest with higher doses.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices                


Binge drinking could trigger abnormal heart rhythms

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Researchers who attended the annual Bavarian beer and folk festival found binge drinkers were more likely to have abnormal heart rhythm patterns.

This could be of potential concern – in extreme cases, abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) can trigger serious complications

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices                


PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease

May 18, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Review

In a nutshell: Over short-term to medium-term follow-up, PCSK9 inhibitors reduced LDL-C. Studies with medium-term follow-up time (longest median follow-up recorded was 26 months) reported that PCSK9 inhibitors (compared with placebo) decreased CVD risk but may have increased the risk of any adverse events (driven by SPIRE-1 and -2 trials). Available evidence suggests that PCSK9 inhibitor use probably leads to little or no difference in mortality. Evidence on relative efficacy and safety when PCSK9 inhibitors were compared with active treatments was of low to very low quality (GRADE); follow-up times were short and events were few. Large trials with longer follow-up are needed to evaluate PCSK9 inhibitors versus active treatments as well as placebo. Owing to the predominant inclusion of high-risk patients in these studies, applicability of results to primary prevention is limited. Finally, estimated risk differences indicate that PCSK9 inhibitors only modestly change absolute risks (often to less than 1%).

Length of publication: 111 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  Cochrane Library                


Psychological interventions for coronary heart disease

May 18, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Review

In a nutshell: This updated Cochrane Review found that for people with CHD, there was no evidence that psychological treatments had an effect on total mortality, the risk of revascularisation procedures, or on the rate of non-fatal MI, although the rate of cardiac mortality was reduced and psychological symptoms (depression, anxiety, or stress) were alleviated; however, the GRADE assessments suggest considerable uncertainty surrounding these effects. Considerable uncertainty also remains regarding the people who would benefit most from treatment (i.e. people with or without psychological disorders at baseline) and the specific components of successful interventions. Future large-scale trials testing the effectiveness of psychological therapies are required due to the uncertainty within the evidence. Future trials would benefit from testing the impact of specific (rather than multifactorial) psychological interventions for participants with CHD, and testing the targeting of interventions on different populations (i.e. people with CHD, with or without psychopathologies).

Length of publication: 177 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  Cochrane Library