CARDIOVASCULAR HORIZON SCANNING Volume 9 Issue 2

February 14, 2017

Increasing Physical Activity and Decreasing Sedentary Behaviour in the Workplace

February 14, 2017

Source: Alberta Centre for Active Living

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: The Alberta Centre for Active Living completed a systematic review on workplace interventions that focus on increasing physical activity, reducing sedentary behaviour, or both.    The purpose of this project was to:  •describe the most effective workplace interventions at increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behaviour,  •identify tools to assist with the implementation of workplace interventions, and  •provide general recommendations to workplaces and workplace champions on developing and maintaining a workplace that moves more and sits less.

Length of publication:

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Alberta Centre for Active Living


Health matters: combating high blood pressure Guidance

February 14, 2017

Source: Public Health England

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Guidance

In a nutshell: Public Health England has published this professional resource, which outlines how providers and commissioners can reduce the population average blood pressure through improved prevention, detection and management.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  Public Health England


Hypertension in 2017—What Is the Right Target?

February 14, 2017

Source: The JAMA Network

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Viewpoint

In a nutshell: In this Viewpoint, the author proposes blood pressure goals for treatment of hypertension in light of data from the ACCORD, SPRINT, and HOPE-3 trials, which tested differences in patient outcomes by treatment targets.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: The JAMA Network


Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

February 14, 2017

Source: Circulation

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Scientific Statement

In a nutshell: Discusses the cardiometabolic health effects of eating patterns: skipping breakfast, intermittent fasting, meal frequency (number of daily eating occasions), and timing of eating and propose definitions for meals, snacks, and eating occasions for use in research.

Length of publication: 27 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    Circulation


A pattern of brain activity may link stress to heart attacks

February 14, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  “The effect of constant stress on a deep-lying region of the brain explains the increased risk of heart attack, a study in The Lancet suggests,” BBC News reports.

Research suggests that stress stimulates the amygdala. The amygdala is, in evolutionary terms, one of the oldest areas of the brain and has been linked to some of the most primal types of emotion, such as fear and stress. It is thought to be responsible for triggering the classic “fight or flight” response in situations of potential danger.

Researchers in the US, using medical imaging, found that higher levels of activity in the amygdala predicted how likely people were to have a heart attack or stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Further dissemination

February 14, 2017

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