Chocolate consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis of prospective studies

October 19, 2018

Source: Heart Journal

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Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Article (abstract)

In a nutshell: Studies investigating the impact of chocolate consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) have reached inconsistent conclusions. As such, a quantitative assessment of the dose–response association between chocolate consumption and incident CVD has not been reported. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the risk of CVD with chocolate consumption. Chocolate consumption may be associated with reduced risk of CVD at <100 g/week consumption. Higher levels may negate the health benefits and induce adverse effects associated with high sugar consumption.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Heart Journal

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Increased vascular endothelial growth factor D is associated with atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke

October 19, 2018

Source: Heart Journal

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Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Article (abstract)

In a nutshell: Increased VEGF-D concentrations were associated with AF and ischaemic stroke. The relationship with ischaemic stroke was more pronounced in subjects with a diagnosis of AF.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Heart Journal


Antibodies cut heart attack risk

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Specific antibodies could protect against heart attacks, according to a study published in the journal EBioMedicine. Researchers from Imperial College London studied patients with high blood pressure of whom 87 had developed coronary heart disease (CHD) in one study in collaboration with Lund University in Sweden. They also studied another 143 patients who had their heart arteries extensively studied using cutting edge techniques in collaboration with researchers from the Thorax centre in Holland.

They found that those who had heart attacks in the first study, as well as those whose arteries had unstable fatty plaques in the second study had much lower levels of an antibody called IgM anti MDA-LDL. Those who had the highest levels, were well protected from developing dangerous plaques in their arteries, with around a 70 per cent less chance of developing heart disease over nearly five years from one of the studies.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


New 20 minute test diagnoses hidden heart condition

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New tests can diagnose ‘hidden’ heart diseases – such as microvascular angina – caused by problems with the small blood vessels supplying the heart, according to research funded by us and presented at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference today in San Diego. The new tests are not yet standard in the NHS because, before now, there has not been enough evidence gathered about whether they would benefit patients. Now, researchers say that they should be routinely available to pinpoint the cause of chest pain.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Genetic tool to predict adult heart attack risk in childhood

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: People at high risk of a heart attack in adulthood could be spotted much earlier in life with a one-off DNA test, according to new research. An international team led by researchers from the University of Leicester, University of Cambridge and the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia used UK Biobank data to develop and test a powerful scoring system, called a Genomic Risk Score (GRS) which can identify people who are at risk of developing coronary heart disease prematurely because of their genetics.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Growing diabetes epidemic could trigger ‘sharp rise’ in heart attacks and strokes by 2035

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: According to our new analysis the number of people suffering heart attacks and strokes as a result of their diabetes could rise by 29% by 2035. The forecast reveals that the growing number of people with diabetes could result in nearly 39,000 people living with diabetes suffering a heart attack in 2035 – a rise of 9,000 compared to 2015 – and over 50,000 people suffering a stroke – a rise of 11,000.

Today in England, nearly 4 million people are living with diabetes. But this is expected to rise to over 5 million over the next 20 years, partly due to people’s worsening lifestyles and the UK’s growing obesity rates.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

 


Y chromosome puts men at risk of heart disease

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New research funded by us suggests that heart disease risk can be passed from father to son. The research, presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich shows that men who carry a specific type of Y chromosome are at an 11 per cent increased risk of heart and circulatory disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation