Making prevention a priority: One year on from the Prevention Green Paper

August 6, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation  

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Date of publication:  22 July 2020

Publication type: News

In a nutshell:  It’s been one year since the Government vowed to take steps to detect and prevent ill health with the launch of its Prevention Green Paper: Advancing our health prevention in the 2020s – and we’re still waiting on the Government to present measurable interventions which will help produce true health benefits.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://www.bhf.org.uk/


Identifying people at risk of rare statins side-effects

August 6, 2020

Source:   British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication:  24 July 2020

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell:  Researchers we fund at the University of Oxford have published new findings that identify a combination of factors that put some patients at higher risk of myopathy, a rare side-effect of statin therapy. Myopathy is characterised by muscle pain or weakness in combination with high blood levels of creatine kinase, a marker of muscle damage

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://www.bhf.org.uk/


Heart scans could lead to better treatment for patients in hospital with coronavirus

August 6, 2020

Source:  British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication:  13 July 2020

Publication type:  Research

In a nutshell:  Half of Covid-19 patients who received a heart scan in hospital showed abnormalities in heart function, according to new research.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://www.bhf.org.uk/


ACE inhibitors and ARBs do not make coronavirus worse

August 6, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation  

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Date of publication:  8 July 2020

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell:  Drugs commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure do not worsen coronavirus (Covid-19) disease, according to research we part-funded

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://www.bhf.org.uk/


Diabetes and coronary artery disease: not just a risk factor

August 6, 2020

Source: Heart journal

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Date of publication:  June 2020

Publication type: Education

In a nutshell:  Article discussing the relationship between diabetes and coronary artery disease. (Subscription required).

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://heart.bmj.com/


Predicting sudden cardiac death in adults with congenital heart disease

August 6, 2020

Source: Heart journal

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Date of publication:  June 2020

Publication type: Research article

In a nutshell:  Objectives To develop, calibrate, test and validate a logistic regression model for accurate risk prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and non-fatal sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD), based on baseline lesion-specific risk stratification and individual’s characteristics, to guide primary prevention strategies.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://heart.bmj.com/


‘Heart-in-a-dish’ to study the effects of coronavirus Source: British Heart Foundation

August 6, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation  

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Date of publication:  18 June 2020

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell:  BHF-funded researchers are using stem cell ‘heart-in-a-dish’ technology – originally created to explore potential treatments for heart failure – to help understand how and why coronavirus (Covid-19) impacts the heart.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://www.bhf.org.uk/


Research begins to rapidly understand deadly link between Covid-19 and cardiovascular diseases

August 6, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation  

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Date of publication:  11 June 2020

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Improved care for people with heart and circulatory disease suffering from Covid-19 could soon be available after we and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) announced support for six flagship research programmes.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   https://www.bhf.org.uk/


Eating an egg a day does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke

April 21, 2020

Source: NHS Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication:  March 2020

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  In a new study, researchers used dietary information from 215,618 people in the US, dating back to 1980. They found no evidence that people eating an egg a day had a higher risk of heart attack or stroke than people who rarely or never ate eggs, once their overall diet and lifestyle was taken into account. The researchers pooled their study results with those of 27 other studies from around the world. The pooled results also found no increased risk of heart attack or stroke for people eating eggs.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Behind the Headlines


Could a chip the size of a pen tip help hearts beat better?

April 21, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation

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 Date of publication:  April 2020

 Publication type: News

In a nutshell:    Researchers we fund believe that a chip that reads the body’s own breathing signals could be much more effective than a pacemaker.  Our heart, like any popular melody, has a vital pulse.

Its beat is never constant, it varies with every breath – speeding up when you inhale and slowing down when you exhale.

But for many of us, it may beat too slowly, too quickly, or irregularly. For those with heart failure, this difference in heart rate can prove deadly.

It’s why pacemakers are fitted to set a regular heart rate, easing a hearts struggle to pump blood properly.

Now, researchers believe a chip that reads the body’s own breathing signals to control one’s heart beat could be much more effective.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Are open fires and wood-burners bad for your health?

April 21, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation

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 Date of publication:  April 2020

 Publication type: News

In a nutshell:   There are few who don’t enjoy warming up by a fire in winter or sitting around a fire pit outside in the summer. In fact, these are such popular activities that around one in 10 British homes feature an open fire or a wood-burning stove – a total of 2.7million residences.

Yet few people know that for every minute we spend warming ourselves by the fire, tiny toxic air pollution particles known as PM2.5 are being released into the air, causing harm to our health.

This is one of the most harmful forms of air pollution. In fact, our research has shown that PM2.5 can enter our bloodstream and increase our risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Virtual heart map to help doctors locate artery blockages

April 21, 2020

Source: British Heart Foundation

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 Date of publication:  April 2020

 Publication type: News

In a nutshell:    Currently, when a patient has a cardiac event or sees their doctor to complain of chest pain, they will often be sent for an angiogram – an X-ray used to examine blood vessels that can show whether patients have coronary artery disease, where fatty plaques build up in the vessels supplying blood to the heart. However, because the results aren’t always clear, there can be ambiguity as to where the problem areas are and their severity.

A pressure wire test can be performed to more accurately measure the blood pressure gradient across a narrowing within the heart, and tell doctors whether a person will benefit from treatment to open the blood vessels up. However, few people receive the test as it is expensive and time-consuming.

Prof Gunn and his team have developed a computer model called virtual Fractional Flow Reserve (vFFR) that calculates the pressure measurements from pictures of the blood vessels without needing the wire. It could provide greater clinical insight for doctors when making decisions about how to treat coronary artery disease.

Using data collected from hundreds of existing angiograms, the software has been proven to be accurate as tested against real pressure wire measurements. It displays the pressure gradient in colour, a healthy blood pressure gradient being green, and a significant pressure gradient in red.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library. https://www.hlisd.org/

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation