Physical activity statistics 2015

February 10, 2015

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type: Statistics

In a nutshell: This is an update of the 2012 publication by the British Heart Foundation Centre on Population Approaches for Non-Communicable Disease Prevention. The new report highlights the importance of physical activity to cardiovascular health. It documents physical activity levels and sedentary behaviour of children and adults in the UK. Statistics are grouped by region and by household income, as well as by type of activity. Comparisons are given with EU statistics. There is also a chapter on cardiac rehabilitation.

Length of publication: 124 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Training very hard ‘as bad as no exercise at all’

February 10, 2015

Source: BBC News health

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A Danish study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests that jogging at a steady pace for less than 150 minutes a week was best for health. Joggers and non-joggers had been prospectively followed up since 2001. The findings of the study suggested that light and moderate joggers had lower mortality than the sedentary group but that strenuous joggers had a mortality rate not statistically different from that of the sedentary non-joggers.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Journal of the American College of Cardiology


Steps to solving inactivity

December 22, 2014

Source: UK Active

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Date of publication: November 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Official government data shows that 29% of people in England are physically inactive. Local authorities have nearly doubled the amount of public health funding they have allocated to tackling the issue of inactivity. The details of 952 physical activity programmes, increasing the activity levels of 3.5 million people annually, have been submitted to a national review. This report makes recommendations for government, local authorities and the activity sector.

Length of publication: 58 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Yoga may guard against heart disease, study finds

December 19, 2014

Source: BBC News Health

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Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This news article discusses a systematic review of 37 studies, involving nearly 3000 people, which found that yoga may be beneficial for protecting against heart disease, especially for people who cannot do more vigorous forms of exercise. Yoga was independently linked to a lowering of heart risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol and obesity when compared with no exercise. The calming effect of yoga may be beneficial, as stress in linked to high blood pressure and heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BMJ


What is preventing progress? Time to move from talk to action

November 10, 2014

Source: The Richmond Group of Charities

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Date of publication: November 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report argues that tackling common risk factors such as smoking, alcohol, inactivity and unhealthy eating would drastically reduce the number of people affected by heart disease, cancer, lung disease and diabetes. The ten charities involved in the report outline nine key calls to action for politicians and decision-makers to ensure that disease prevention is at the top of the agenda.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Experts call for new focus on physical activity

November 7, 2014

Source: BBC News Health

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The effects of inactivity are linked to heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Many people are failing to meet the recommended level of 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. This report focuses on a community-based competition called ‘Beat the Street’ to challenge inactivity. It is based mainly in primary schools but also encourages participation from GP surgeries, local clubs and businesses. The GP who devised this scheme says that 10% more people meet the recommended level of activity after Beat the Street, and 22% of people who were physically inactive before the scheme have become more active.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Yoga for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

June 19, 2014

Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2014, Issue 5

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Date of publication: May 2014

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell: This review assessed the effectiveness of any type of yoga in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in healthy adults and also in those at high risk of CVD. Eleven randomised controlled trials and two studies in progress were identified. Most of the trials had small numbers of participants and were short-term. The authors found some evidence that yoga has favourable effects on diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. However, due to the size and duration of the studies, the results should be interpreted with caution.

Length of publication: 51 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.