The cost effectiveness of ivabradine in the treatment of chronic heart failure

June 19, 2014

Source: Heart, 2014, 100 (13) p. 1031-6

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Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This economic evaluation assessed the cost-effectiveness of ivabradine from the perspective of the UK National Health Service, based on the results of the SHIfT trial. Ivabradine is expected to have a 95% chance of being cost-effective in the EU-licensed population using the current NICE cost-effectiveness threshold of £20,000 per QALY.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

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Cost effectiveness of telehealth for patients with long term conditions

April 12, 2013

Source: BMJ, 22nd March 2013; Correction published 28th March 2013

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Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This economic evaluation examined the costs and cost-effectiveness of telehealth. 3230 people with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or diabetes were recruited for this telehealth trial. The authors concluded that telehealth does not seem to be a cost-effective addition to standard support and treatment.

Length of publication: 19 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Effectiveness of physical activity promotion based in primary care

April 13, 2012

Source: BMJ, 2012, 344 (7850)

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Date of publication: March 2012

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell: A systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials. The trials involved the promotion of physical activity in sedentary adults, by phone or in person, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Three trials investigated exercise referrals. The researchers found that physical activity levels significantly increased after one year, but that there was insufficient evidence to recommend exercise referral schemes over advice or counselling interventions. More trials are needed to determine the effectiveness of exercise referral interventions.

Length of publication: 17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Assessment of physical activity levels in South Asians in the UK: findings from the Health Survey for England

June 8, 2011

Source: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2011, vol 65 (6), pp 517-521

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Date of publication: June 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Data from Health Survey England comparing the physical activity levels of over 5000 South Asians with those of nearly 9000 white participants, found consistent ethnic group differences. Suggests that increasing physical activity in this ethnic group should be a public health priority.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: National Heart Forum eResearch briefing 12 May 2011


Combined impact of lifestyle-related factors on total and cause-specific mortality

October 11, 2010

Source: PLoS Medicine September 2010, volume 7 issue 9

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Date of publication: September 2010

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This study involved 71,243 women who did not smoke or drink alcohol regularly. Their lifestyles were rated from 0 to 5, with points for taking daily exercise, eating fruit and vegetables and other factors. The study indicated that a relatively unhealthy lifestyle, scoring less than 4, contributed to 59% of cardiovascular deaths among the non-smoking, non-drinking participants. The results of the study therefore support the importance of overall lifestyle modification in disease prevention.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Telemonitoring and self-management in the control of hypertension

July 21, 2010

Source: Lancet, 2010, 376 (9736) p. 163-172

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to assess whether self-management by patients with poorly-controlled hypertension resulted in better control of their blood pressure. 24 general practices took part. Participants were responsible for self-monitoring of blood pressure and self-titration of anti-hypertensive drugs, in addition to telemonitoring of home blood pressure measurements. The results showed that self-management of hypertension, combined with telemonitoring of blood pressure measurements, forms an important new addition to control of hypertension in primary care.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Automated electronic reminders to facilitate primary cardiovascular disease prevention

April 14, 2010

Source: British Journal of General Practice, 2010, 60 (573) p. 137-143

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Date of publication: April 2010

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A randomised controlled trial involving 19 general practices in England. A system of automated electronic reminders, called E-Nudge, was tested for its effects on cardiovascular events and risk estimation. The study found that electronic reminders can increase the visibility of patients at risk.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: IngentaConnect