CARDIOVASCULAR HORIZON SCANNING Volume 9 Issue 6

June 8, 2017

Iron deficiency in heart failure patients contributes to poor outcomes

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Patients admitted with acute heart failure who exhibit iron deficiency (ID) tend to have a longer and more expensive hospital stay and a greater likelihood of readmission, according to analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) conference in Manchester.   The research, which looked at data over three consecutive years, showed that 14 per cent of patients with heart failure also had ID as a secondary diagnosis, and that hospital spells for these patients were significantly more costly than those without ID.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


New imaging technique leads to promising results for experimental heart attack drug

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Every day 190 people in the UK die from a heart attack. Researchers in Oxford have used a scanning method to develop a new drug which may help hearts heal.

The scientists unveiled their promising work on a new drug to help patients who have suffered a heart attack. Presenting at the British Cardiovascular Society’s annual conference, the BHF-funded team from the University of Oxford described how an experimental drug called 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) may improve heart function after a heart attack.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


Promising new therapy may help heart attack patients’ hearts heal

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A naturally occurring molecule called interleukin-4 may help patients recover from a heart attack, according to research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference today.  The findings show that heart attack patients with low blood levels of a particular white blood cell, called an eosinophil, have higher death rates in the six months after their heart attack. Researchers have also discovered that treating these patients with a molecule called interleukin-4 (IL-4) may help to reduce these death rates.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation      


Beta-blockers ‘useless’ for many heart attack patients, study reports

June 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Many patients given beta blockers after a heart attack may not benefit from being on the drugs, suggesting they may be being overprescribed,” The Guardian reports.

Beta-blockers are drugs used to regulate the heart by making it beat more slowly and with less force. They are often used in people who have heart failure or are thought to be at risk of heart failure.

A new study has collected data from England and Wales from more than 170,000 people who had a heart attack but did not have heart failure. The researchers wanted to see if beta-blockers improved health outcomes in this set of patients.

The study compared mortality rates between those who were prescribed beta blockers and those who weren’t when they were discharged from hospital. Though there were fewer deaths one year later among people prescribed beta blockers (5% vs. 11%), the researchers concluded that beta blockers did not affect risk of death once other risk factors and medications were taken into consideration.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines                


Development and validation of QRISK3 risk prediction algorithms to estimate future risk of cardiovascular disease: prospective cohort study

June 8, 2017

Source: BMJ

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Study

In a nutshell: Results 363 565 incident cases of cardiovascular disease were identified in the derivation cohort during follow-up arising from 50.8 million person years of observation. All new risk factors considered met the model inclusion criteria except for HIV/AIDS, which was not statistically significant. The models had good calibration and high levels of explained variation and discrimination. In women, the algorithm explained 59.6% of the variation in time to diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (R2, with higher values indicating more variation), and the D statistic was 2.48 and Harrell’s C statistic was 0.88 (both measures of discrimination, with higher values indicating better discrimination). The corresponding values for men were 54.8%, 2.26, and 0.86. Overall performance of the updated QRISK3 algorithms was similar to the QRISK2 algorithms.  Conclusion Updated QRISK3 risk prediction models were developed and validated. The inclusion of additional clinical variables in QRISK3 (chronic kidney disease, a measure of systolic blood pressure variability (standard deviation of repeated measures), migraine, corticosteroids, SLE, atypical antipsychotics, severe mental illness, and erectile dysfunction) can help enable doctors to identify those at most risk of heart disease and stroke.

Length of publication: 16 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BMJ              


Further dissemination

June 8, 2017

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