Growing diabetes epidemic could trigger ‘sharp rise’ in heart attacks and strokes by 2035

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: According to our new analysis the number of people suffering heart attacks and strokes as a result of their diabetes could rise by 29% by 2035. The forecast reveals that the growing number of people with diabetes could result in nearly 39,000 people living with diabetes suffering a heart attack in 2035 – a rise of 9,000 compared to 2015 – and over 50,000 people suffering a stroke – a rise of 11,000.

Today in England, nearly 4 million people are living with diabetes. But this is expected to rise to over 5 million over the next 20 years, partly due to people’s worsening lifestyles and the UK’s growing obesity rates.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

 


Y chromosome puts men at risk of heart disease

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New research funded by us suggests that heart disease risk can be passed from father to son. The research, presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich shows that men who carry a specific type of Y chromosome are at an 11 per cent increased risk of heart and circulatory disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


New research could help people with hidden heart disease

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Researchers at the University of Aberdeen are working to identify people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who may also have an undiagnosed heart condition.

COPD is a long-term lung condition that can cause severe breathing difficulties, and many people diagnosed with the condition also have some forms of heart disease, although they may not be aware that they have heart problems.

Beta blockers are often used to treat people with coronary heart disease, irregular heart rhythms and heart failure. Researchers are currently investigating whether, in people living with COPD, beta blockers may prevent sudden deterioration in their breathing. Dr Dana Dawson and her team at the University of Aberdeen have been awarded £299,169 by the BHF to lead a three-year clinical study to investigate whether the people with COPD who benefit from beta blockers have a hidden, undiagnosed heart condition.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Public Health England launch free online Heart Age Test that gives early warning of heart attack and stroke risk

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: We are supporting Public Health England in their call for adults across the country to take a free, online Heart Age Test, which will provide an immediate estimation of their ‘heart age’. If someone’s heart age is higher than their actual age, they are at an increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Antibodies cut heart attack risk

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Researchers from Imperial College London studied patients with high blood pressure of whom 87 had developed coronary heart disease (CHD) in one study in collaboration with Lund University in Sweden. They also studied another 143 patients who had their heart arteries extensively studied using cutting edge techniques in collaboration with researchers from the Thorax centre in Holland.

They found that those who had heart attacks in the first study, as well as those whose arteries had unstable fatty plaques in the second study had much lower levels of an antibody called IgM anti MDA-LDL. Those who had the highest levels, were well protected from developing dangerous plaques in their arteries, with around a 70 per cent less chance of developing heart disease over nearly five years from one of the studies.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Testing oxygen levels of newborn babies helps find serious heart defects

September 21, 2018

Source: National Institute for Health Research

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Date of publication: July 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Measuring oxygen levels in newborn babies as part of routine care can identify cases of critical congenital heart defects sooner than waiting until symptoms appear. If 10,000 babies were screened, pulse oximetry could correctly identify about 5 of the 6 expected asymptomatic cases and might miss one. This international research suggests there would be about 14 false alarms. Waiting until babies are at least 24 hours old minimises the number of these false positives.

Babies with critical heart defects often show no symptoms at birth. Early detection of these problems increases the chance of successful treatment. This systematic review looked at 21 studies of 457,202 babies where pulse oximetry (measuring the amount of oxygen in the blood using a device put on the hand or foot) was used as a simple screening test.

Pulse oximetry correctly identifies 76.3% of babies who have critical congenital heart defects. It also correctly identifies 99.9% of healthy babies without problems.

Current UK newborn screening programmes do not include pulse oximetry because a national pilot scheme suggested there would be higher false positive results in routine NHS practice.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: National Institute for Health Research


‘Virtual wards’ reduce readmissions in people after hospitalisation for heart failure

September 21, 2018

Source: National Institute for Health Research

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Date of publication: August 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: People with heart failure who receive care via virtual wards following discharge from hospital have lower rates of heart failure-related readmission and death than people discharged to other types of care.

However, virtual wards did not show similar benefits when offered to people leaving hospital with other high-risk chronic diseases.

This systematic review included randomised controlled trials of virtual wards, defined as with four operational criteria to be intensive multidisciplinary team management provided in a community setting. Out of hospital care, typically by primary care physicians, was the most common control.

This study supports the idea that an enhanced and more rounded approach to care may improve post-discharge outcomes in people with heart failure. The review described interventions that are applicable to UK care models. The evidence may be a starting point for further evaluation or trials of these.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: National Institute for Health Research