‘Know your cholesterol like you know your Pin code’

February 28, 2019

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: People are being encouraged to know their cholesterol and blood pressure numbers as well as they know their bank Pin code – because it could save their life.

These numbers flag up early signs of cardiovascular disease, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Forty health organisations have teamed up to urge more people to go for a routine NHS health check.

Doctors should also identify and treat at-risk patients better, they say.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes one in four deaths in England, the equivalent of someone dying every four minutes, according to Public Health England and NHS England.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   BBC Health News

 

 

 


Marijuana may be risky for those with heart disease

February 28, 2019

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Case Study

In a nutshell: Although marijuana may have some benefits, its use could cause health issues for older people with cardiovascular disease. One case, in particular, is sparking some questions.   A Canadian Journal of Cardiology case report examined a 70-year-old man who had a heart attack after eating a lollipop that was infused with 90 milligrams (mg) of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — which is largely responsible for marijuana’s psychological effects.

The man lived with stable coronary artery disease, and he was taking cardiac medication. He ate most of the lollipop and did so to help minimize pain and improve sleep.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   Medical News Today


Ability to do push-ups may predict cardiovascular risk

February 28, 2019

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A new study suggests that the more push-ups a man is able to complete, the lower his cardiovascular risk and vice versa. These findings may establish a new measure of risk assessment that is simple and does not require costly specialized equipment.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   Medical News Today


Study in Birmingham could lead to better detection of people with irregular heart rhythm

February 28, 2019

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Date of publication: January 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Research that we part-fund at the University of Birmingham could better identify people living with an undiagnosed abnormal heart rhythm. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common forms of abnormal heart rhythm. It has been diagnosed in 1.3 million people in the UK, but it is estimated that there are hundreds of thousands of people living with undiagnosed AF in the country. It is also a major cause of stroke, as it can increase the risk of a blood clot forming inside the heart, which can then travel in the bloodstream to the brain.

An electrocardiogram (ECG) – a test that measures the electrical activity in the heart – is usually used to screen people for AF, but this is resource-intensive and can be burdensome for some patients.

Now, researchers believe some patients could be tested for AF through simple blood tests.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Statins reduce heart attack and stroke risk in older people

February 28, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: According to new research that we part-funded, statins lower the risk of heart attack and stroke in all ages, including older people over the age of 75. The study was published in The Lancet. This new study also revealed that statin therapy did not increase the risk of deaths from diseases not linked to the heart, including cancer.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Artificial intelligence predicts outcomes for heart patients

February 28, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: For the first time researchers that we part-fund have used Artificial Intelligence to predict outcomes for heart patients using MRI scans, enabling doctors to find the best treatments for individual patients. The computer program, called 4Dsurvival, takes each patient’s scan and tracks the motion of the heart at hundreds of points every second. From these 3D pictures of the moving heart the machine learns to predict the risk of dying from heart failure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Heart failure survival rates stubbornly low

February 28, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Survival after a diagnosis of heart failure in the United Kingdom has shown only modest improvement in the 21st century and lags behind other serious conditions, such as cancer, finds a large study published by The BMJ today. The findings also show that survival is worse for people requiring admission to hospital around the time of diagnosis, and for those in the most deprived groups.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation