A randomised trial of a remote home support programme for infants with major congenital heart disease

October 12, 2012

Source: Heart, 2012, 98 (20) p. 1523-1528

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2012

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A tele-medicine home support programme for families of infants with major congenital heart disease was assessed and evaluated in this study. Home support with video-conferencing was preferred to telephone consultations. Parents were highly satisfied with the programme. The research concluded that tele-homecare is sustainable, effective and may reduce costs.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Europe: European health and lifestyle expectancies

October 11, 2012

Source: National Heart Forum eNews Briefing 20/09/2012

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: 19 September 2012

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Results from the largest ever health and lifestyle survey of 26 European cities have been published. Includes Birmingham, Cardiff, Glasgow, Greater Manchester, and Merseyside. The gap between rich and poor in urban areas is increasing.

Length of publication: 1 web page plus links

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Superheart to the rescue

October 10, 2012

Source: The Lancet, 2012, 380 (9848), p. 1122

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Editorial

In a nutshell: 29th September 2012 was World Heart Day, and the focus this year was on prevention of heart disease in women and children. As part of World Heart Day, the cartoon character ‘Superheart’ was created to appeal to children aged between 7 and 10. This superhero plays football rather than computer games and chases away fast food and fizzy drinks. A report called ‘F as in Fat: how obesity threatens America’s future’ predicts that the number of new cases of coronary heart disease and stroke could increase ten times by 2020 and then double again by 2030. Preventive interventions to change behaviour in children and adolescents are therefore important for improving heart health.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: World Health Federation


Population approaches to improve diet, physical activity and smoking habits

October 9, 2012

Source: Circulation, 2012, 126 (12) p. 1514-1563

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Policies

In a nutshell: This scientific statement from the American Heart Association systematically reviewed the current evidence for effective population approaches to improve eating habits, increase physical activity and reduce smoking. A range of population-based strategies promoting changes to lifestyle were identified and graded. The findings provide a framework for policy makers and other stakeholders to implement effective interventions.

Length of publication: 50 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: American Heart Association


Could blood tests pick up early ‘silent’ heart disease?

October 9, 2012

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A clinical trial in Dundee gave blood tests to 300 people with high blood pressure or cholesterol. The tests were for troponin and b-type natriuretic peptide. Positive tests were often associated with damage to the heart at an early stage. In the future, these tests, coupled with a simple heart scan, could be used to identify people with very early signs of heart disease. They could then be treated to prevent the disease from progressing.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Journal of the American College of Cardiology


Further dissemination

October 9, 2012

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