CARDIOVASCULAR HORIZON SCANNING Volume 6 Issue 10

November 14, 2014

Lifestyle for relevant to heart disease than genetics

November 10, 2014

Source:  The Telegraph

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Doctors from the Intermountain Medical Centre Heart Institute, in the US have found lifestyle factors are more accurate at predicting risk of cardiac arrest than genetics history. The researchers said that although having a genetic predisposition to heart disease did increase a persons risk, having a small genetic risk could become significant if the person led an unhealthy lifestyle.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Greater risk of heart disease and strokes for those with mental illness

November 10, 2014

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  A paper presented by researchers from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto have found patients who had been or were mentally ill were twice as likely to have a stroke or experience heart disease than the general population. Lead researchers, Dr Goldie said that those with mental health issues were much more likely to adopt bad habits, such as poor diet, smoking and drinking alcohol leading to the increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Goldie believes more needs to be done to steer the mentally ill away from taking up these habits.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  UK Health Forum


Money and lives would be saved by tackling global warming

November 10, 2014

Source: The Guardian

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  John Abraham discusses a recent study published in the JAMA on climate change and its knock on effects in public health. Abraham points to issues like floods, heat waves and increased ozone at ground level and their ability to cause cardiovascular disease, repository conditions and a host of other conditions. By tackling climate change and preparing for those we can not, many lives and money could be saved.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  UK Health Forum


Obese children can begin to show signs of future heart problems

November 10, 2014

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers from the University of Leipzig have found they could detect possible heart problems in obese children and teenagers. Using an ultrasound, researchers were able to assess blood flow through the valves and chambers of the heart and found changes in the shape and function in the hearts of children who were obese compared with those within normal weight boundaries. Further research is needed to find out if the changes to the heart are reversible and the predictive value of these cardiovascular changes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Uk Health Forum


What is preventing progress? Time to move from talk to action

November 10, 2014

Source: The Richmond Group of Charities

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Date of publication: November 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report argues that tackling common risk factors such as smoking, alcohol, inactivity and unhealthy eating would drastically reduce the number of people affected by heart disease, cancer, lung disease and diabetes. The ten charities involved in the report outline nine key calls to action for politicians and decision-makers to ensure that disease prevention is at the top of the agenda.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Experts call for new focus on physical activity

November 7, 2014

Source: BBC News Health

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The effects of inactivity are linked to heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Many people are failing to meet the recommended level of 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. This report focuses on a community-based competition called ‘Beat the Street’ to challenge inactivity. It is based mainly in primary schools but also encourages participation from GP surgeries, local clubs and businesses. The GP who devised this scheme says that 10% more people meet the recommended level of activity after Beat the Street, and 22% of people who were physically inactive before the scheme have become more active.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Smartphone-based home care model improved use of cardiac rehabilitation

November 7, 2014

Source: Heart, 2014, 100 (22) p. 1770-1779

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Date of publication: November 2014

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This unblinded randomised controlled trial aimed to investigate the effect of smartphone-based home service delivery of cardiac rehabilitation compared with traditional centre-based programmes for post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The results of this smartphone-based home care cardiac rehabilitation programme showed improved post-MI cardiac rehabiliation uptake, adherence and completion.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Healthier lives: diabetes, hypertension and NHS Health Check

November 6, 2014

Source: Public Health England

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: Healthier Lives is a new interactive tool which shows the large variation in prevalence and treatment of hypertension and diabetes around England as well as the provision of the NHS Health Check to prevent heart disease and other conditions. The data allows people to see how their GP surgery, CCG and Local Authority are performing compared to the national average.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Press release


Chest pain symptom scoring can improve the quality of referrals

November 4, 2014

Source: BMJ Quality Improvement Reports

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: Case study

In a nutshell: GPs need to identify patients who are presenting with either possible or typical angina problems and refer them for specialist assessment to a Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic (RACPC). However, there is a possibility that GPs may be cautiously over-diagnosing angina. This study incorporated chest pain symptom scoring in to the referral form, which resulted in improved GP discrimination of chest pain and fewer avoidable referrals.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Barking and Havering NHS Trust


Further dissemination

November 4, 2014

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