CARDIOVASCULAR HORIZON SCANNING Volume 6 Issue 9

October 14, 2014

Type 1 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease

October 10, 2014

Source: Circulation, 2014, 130 (13), 1110-1130

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Date of publication: September 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This is a scientific statement from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association. It examines the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes.

Length of publication: 35 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Heart disease warning factors ‘missed by many adults’

October 10, 2014

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: September 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The British Heart Foundation has commissioned a survey which has found that only 2% of people are worried about coronary heart disease whereas a third of people were concerned about dementia or cancer. One in ten adults surveyed said they didn’t know how to look after their hearts.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


People are not motivated to improve lifestyle despite family history of heart disease

October 8, 2014

Source:  Medical News Today

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Date of publication: September 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers from HeartAge have found many people are unwilling to make lifestyle changes despite knowing about their family history of heart disease. Though many participants who had a family history of heart disease were aware of their own blood pressure and cholesterol, this knowledge did not translate into them trying to lower their own CVD risk. The researchers believe this stems from a belief that they will get CVD regardless or because they don’t believe it is preventable through behaviour change.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  UK Health Forum


New recommendations for overweight patients with high risk of heart disease

October 8, 2014

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: Online article

In a nutshell: Researchers from the United States Preventive Services Task Force have produced new recommendations for overweight patients who are at risk of heart disease. The key recommendation is that those at risk should be sent to “intensive behavioural counselling” to improve their diet and/or exercise plan. In the study the researchers found counselling was the most effective method of reducing a persons weight and reducing their risk of developing heart disease.  

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


High consumption of sodium estimated to have caused 1.65 million cardiovascular deaths globally each year

October 8, 2014

Source: New England Journal of Medicine

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  Researchers have estimated that 1.65 million cardiovascular deaths each year are directly attributable to excessive sodium consumption. The researchers found that the global average consumption of sodium was 3.95g per day, which is 1.95 grams over the WHO recommended limit.  Those most affected by high sodium cardiovascular death were those in middle- and low-income countries.  

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  UK Health Forum


Good neighbours give health benefits

October 8, 2014

Source:  The Independent

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers from the University of Michigan have found being part of a close community and living next to good neighbours can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.  The effects of having a positive relationship with neighbours and the community at large included the lowering of stress levels and increased social support.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum