The proven health trackers saving thousands of lives

November 15, 2016

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: AliveCor’s recently launched Kardia Band, which integrates with Apple’s smart watch, takes an electrocardiogram (ECG) of your heart, measuring its electrical activity as it pumps away.

Medical experts believe it could potentially save thousands of lives.

It can spot atrial fibrillation (AF) – one of the most common forms of abnormal heart rhythm and a major cause of stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC News


Study recommends screening toddlers for heart disease risk

November 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Toddlers should be screened for an inherited form of heart disease … experts suggest,” BBC News reports.

A new study looked at the feasibility of screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), an inherited condition that affects around 1 to 2 in every 250 people in the UK. It can cause abnormally high cholesterol levels.

It doesn’t usually cause any noticeable symptoms, but people with FH aged between 20 and 40 are 100 times more likely to have a heart attack than other people their age.

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Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


Worrying about health linked to heart disease

November 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Worried well ‘make themselves sick’,” reports The Daily Telegraph.

Several other news outlets covered the same story with headlines about how the “worried well” may be more likely to develop heart disease.

The stories are based on a Norwegian population study with 7,052 participants that aimed to see whether health anxiety (hypochondria) was linked with the development of heart disease.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


Blood Pressure: How can we do better?

November 15, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  Resource

In a nutshell: To improve the detection and management of high blood pressure (BP), GPs, nurses and pharmacists of the CVD Leadership Forum have worked with the BHF and Public Health England’s (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN), Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP), Stroke Association, Blood Pressure UK and British and Irish Hypertension Society to create the ‘BP: How can we do better?’ resource.    Using data from the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Office for National Statistics (ONS) and PHE, this resource is not only a comprehensive summary of CCG-level BP care across the nation, but also provides recommendations for improving care, both at a CCG and practice level.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Bad childhood experiences ‘mean chronic illness more likely’

November 15, 2016

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Children who are exposed to abuse, domestic violence or other stresses are far more likely to develop long term health problems, says new research.

The Public Health Wales study looks at adverse experiences in childhood (ACEs) which include parents separating.

Children with four or more ACEs, around 14%, are three times more likely to get lung or heart disease later in life.

One senior health figure said instead of “mending broken adults” a focus was needed on “building stronger children”.

Length of publication: 1 website

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News