Genetic link to dangerous aneurysms could aid future treatment

December 9, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Thousands of lives could be saved every year after it was discovered a fatal cardiovascular condition could be linked to four genes, according to Leicester research we helped fund.

A 10-year project, led by Professor Matt Bown, looked at 10,000 people worldwide and found those who had suffered an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) had four genes in common.

It is hoped that the findings, published in the journal Circulation Research, could help doctors understand more about the condition, which can lead to fatal internal bleeding if left untreated.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Thousands of heart patients are missing out on cardiac rehabilitation

December 9, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Thousands of heart patients are missing out on cardiac rehabilitation following a heart attack, increasing their risk of suffering a fatal event, according to new figures released today.

Around 66,000 heart patients missed out on cardiac rehabilitation in 2014/15, an effective service to help recovery following a heart attack or procedure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Study highlights heart disease risk for pregnant women

December 9, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Pregnant women and those who have recently given birth need to be aware of the symptoms of heart disease, according to a new report from researchers at the University of Oxford.

The Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths report, from MBRRACE-UK, highlighted that two in 100,000 women died in pregnancy or in the early weeks after childbirth from heart disease, which is the leading cause of women dying in pregnancy or the early weeks after childbirth.

The report showed that overall, 8.5 women per 100,000 died during pregnancy or shortly after giving birth, between 2012 and 2014.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Every breath we take: the lifelong impact of air pollution

December 9, 2016

Source: Royal College of Physicians

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Date of publication: 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: The report starkly sets out the dangerous impact air pollution is currently having on our nation’s health. Each year in the UK, around 40,000 deaths are attributable to exposure to outdoor air pollution which plays a role in many of the major health challenges of our day. It has been linked to cancer, asthma, stroke and heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and changes linked to dementia. The health problems resulting from exposure to air pollution have a high cost to people who suffer from illness and premature death, to our health services and to business. In the UK, these costs add up to more than £20 billion every year.

Length of publication: 123 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Royal College of Physicians


How to manage and reduce stress

December 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Research has shown that stress can sometimes be positive. It makes us more alert and helps us perform better in certain situations. However, stress has only been found as beneficial if it is short-lived. Excessive or prolonged stress can contribute to illness such as heart disease and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum