Stress in early adulthood may lead to heighted risk of high blood pressure

February 8, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

A new study from the online journal Heart suggests a link between the tendency to become easily stressed in adolescents and a heightened risk of developing high blood pressure in later life. The research looked at more than 1.5 million 18-year-old men with normal blood pressure, who had been conscripted to the army in Sweden between 1969 and 1997 until the end of 2012 and were assessed for their levels of stress resilience. At the end of the study, those who were more prone to stress a at the age of 18 were associated with a heightened risk of high blood pressure. The study also shows an increase in the number of cases of high blood pressure, if a young person is overweight.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

Advertisements

Atrial fibrillation stronger risk factor for women than men

February 8, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

Researchers at the University of Oxford have published new findings that an irregular heartbeat is a stronger risk factor for heart disease in women than it is in men.

The research, which was published in the British Medical Journal, involved looking at studies conducted in more than 4 million patients and found that women with atrial fibrillation (AF), a common and often symptomless irregularity of the heart rhythm, are more likely to suffer future heart attacks and strokes than men.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


One in ten Brits admit to doing no physical activity in the last ten years

February 8, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

Over three quarters of Brits are unaware of the recommended minimum amount of physical activity needed every week and are not keen to get active. Our Physical Activity Specialist Lisa Young, comments: “I’m not surprised to learn just how little awareness there is around the recommended minimum amount of exercise people should aim for every week. However, it is very concerning that over one in ten Brits have not been physically active for over ten years and over a third simply blame it on their own laziness! “Physical activity is essential for your heart health and should not be ignored. Not only can keeping fit help reduce your risk of heart disease, it can help you control your weight, reduce blood pressure/cholesterol and improve your mental health.”

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense

February 8, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:

A new report from the UK Health Forum and Cancer Research UK has found that rising rates of obesity and overweight could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. This would cost the NHS an additional £2.5 billion a year by 2035 over and above what is already spent on obesity related disease. The study shows that a one per cent reduction in the number overweight or obese people every year could prevent more than 64,000 cancer cases over the next 20 years and save the NHS £300 million in 2035 alone.

Length of publication: 36 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


NHS Health Checks ‘prevented thousands of heart attacks’

February 8, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

NHS Health Checks, introduced in 2009, are offered to people aged 40 to 74 years old. They look for risk factors associated with a number of related conditions: heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and some types of dementia.

The researchers looked at how many people took part in the programme. While the uptake was initially relatively low (5.8%), this increased to about a third of those eligible in 2012-13.

It is also encouraging that some of the more vulnerable groups – those who are older and those in the most deprived social group – were most likely to attend the checks.

A proportion of those identified as being at high risk of heart disease in the checks started statins (19.3%) or high blood pressure treatment (8.8%). Extrapolating this data, the researchers estimated that NHS Health Checks prevented around 2,500 cases of major cardiovascular events such as stroke and heart attack over the course of five years.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Further dissemination

February 8, 2016

If you think someone would benefit from receiving this posting, please e-mail them the link to this blog and suggest that they sign up to the e-mail newsletter to stay up to date with new content.