Anxiety as a Risk Factor in Cardiovascular Disease

March 14, 2016

Source: Medscape News

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell:

Anxiety has emerged as perhaps the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, determining other known risk factors, such as depression, substance use, overweight, and a sedentary lifestyle.

 

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Medscape News

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Can happiness break your heart?

March 14, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: March2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

This study aimed to assess whether Takotsubo syndrome – which often occurs after negative emotional events leading to “broken heart syndrome” – can also occur after a positive emotional event.

The researchers used data from 1,750 people with TTS and found 485 cases preceded by an emotional event, 20 of which were positive emotional events, leading to the use of the term “happy heart syndrome”. These events ranged from family parties to weddings. 

 

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


The mystery disease causing heart attacks in women

March 14, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare yet devastating condition predominantly affecting young, healthy women. SCAD means the layers which form the coronary vessels of the heart tear away from each other. As a result, blood can collect between the vessel layers forming a blood blister which restricts or blocks blood flow to the heart. This leads to a SCAD heart attack.

A ‘normal’ heart attack is caused by build-up of fatty deposits on the vessel walls, which is entirely different to one caused by SCAD. With little known about this disease, research is key to unlocking its secrets.

Thanks to a group of determined SCAD survivors, the first ever UK clinical study, led by BHF-funded researcher Dr David Adlam at Glenfield Hospital and the University of Leicester, launched in 2014. The group, led by SCAD survivor Becks Breslin, found each other through social media and contacted Dr Adlam to help find answers. Together, Dr Adlam and Becks created the SCAD UK and Europe research portal, giving SCAD survivors from near and far an opportunity to share their stories and register as a participant in this pioneering trial. 

 

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Blood test breakthrough improves diagnosis of inherited heart conditions

March 14, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

A new genetic test for heart conditions which are passed down through families has been developed by researchers.

The international team of researchers, led by Professor Stuart Cook, in Singapore, Imperial College London and at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre showed that by looking at a particular group of genes they were able to reliably test for all known inherited heart condition genes with one simple blood test. 

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense

March 14, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:

A report from the UKHF and CRUK has found that rising rates of obesity and overweight could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 Diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. The report calls on the Government to act now by introducing a tax on sugary drinks and a 9pm watershed ban on TV advertising of junk food as part of its childhood obesity strategy.

Length of publication: 36 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Further Dissemination

March 14, 2016

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