Study argues ditching butter for veg oil won’t prevent heart disease

April 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  “Ditching butter for veg oil may not be better for heart”.  An analysis of previously unpublished data from the 1960s and 70s found no benefit in replacing sources of saturated fats with vegetable oils.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Controlling Sugar, Blood Pressure And Cholesterol May Lower Risk For Cardiovascular Disease

April 11, 2016

Source: American Heart Association

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Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  A new review found that controlling blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels may reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases among diabetes patients. However, recent data show only 25 percent of diabetes patients manage to keep all three levels in check.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: American Heart Association


Vitamin D improves heart function in people with chronic heart failure

April 11, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  A five-year study at the University of Leeds suggests a daily dose of vitamin D improves heart function in people with chronic heart failure. The study, which was funded by the Medical Research Council and involved several BHF-funded researchers including BHF Professor Mark Kearney, found that in the 80 patients who took Vitamin D, the heart’s pumping function improved from 26 per cent to 34 percent. In the others, who took placebo, there was no change in cardiac function.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Death of a partner linked to increased risk of irregular heartbeat

April 11, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A study of over 80,000 people diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, one of the most common forms of abnormal heart rhythm, has suggested that the death of a partner is linked to an increased risk of developing the disease.  The study, which was conducted by researchers at Aarhus University in Denmark, suggested that the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat for the first time was 41% higher among those who had been bereaved than it was among those who had not experienced such a loss.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Vitamin D ‘heals damaged hearts’

April 11, 2016

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  A trial on 163 heart failure patients found supplements vitamin D, which is made in the skin when exposed to sunlight, improved their hearts’ ability to pump blood around the body.  The Leeds Teaching Hospitals team, who presented at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology, described the results as “stunning”.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


Can HRT in early menopause cut heart disease risk?

April 11, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Women who take HRT drugs soon after going through menopause are ‘less likely to suffer heart disease’. A new study found that early adopters of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) might slow their progression toward atherosclerosis (hardening and thickening of the arteries) which can increase the risk of heart disease, heart attacks or strokes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Further dissemination

April 11, 2016

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