Increasing Physical Activity and Decreasing Sedentary Behaviour in the Workplace

February 14, 2017

Source: Alberta Centre for Active Living

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: The Alberta Centre for Active Living completed a systematic review on workplace interventions that focus on increasing physical activity, reducing sedentary behaviour, or both.    The purpose of this project was to:  •describe the most effective workplace interventions at increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behaviour,  •identify tools to assist with the implementation of workplace interventions, and  •provide general recommendations to workplaces and workplace champions on developing and maintaining a workplace that moves more and sits less.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Alberta Centre for Active Living


Majority of heart attack programmes failing to meet minimum standards

January 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  More than two-thirds (70%) of heart attack programmes are failing to meet the minimum requirements for patient care, according to our research.

Cardiac rehabilitation services can help heart attack patients recover and reduce their risk of another major heart event. There are hundreds of programmes spread across the UK and the majority are based at hospitals.

The study, published in Open Heart, is the first of its kind and assessed 170 programmes across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and found that just 52 met at least five of the six national minimum standards.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


New study on why people don’t know they’ve had a heart attack

January 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The American Heart Association (AHA) revealed a new study which showed a link between people who have a high pain tolerance and unrecognised heart attacks– putting them at risk of poorer outcomes. The Norwegian study also found ‘silent’ heart attacks happened more in women, suggesting women’s pain tolerance might help to explain why so many don’t realise they’re having a heart attack.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


‘Not enough over-50s’ taking aspirin to prevent heart disease

January 10, 2017

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication:  December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  U.S. researchers ran a simulation of what might happen if all Americans over 50 years old took aspirin on a daily basis. Their results found that people would live about four months longer on average, adding 900,000 people to the US population by 2036.

The study was designed to demonstrate the possible long-term effects of more people taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines