Even moderate drinking linked to heart and circulatory diseases

April 27, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: April 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Regularly drinking more than the recommended UK guidelines for alcohol could take years off your life, according to new research that we part-funded published today in the Lancet. The study shows that drinking more alcohol is associated with a higher risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and death.

The authors say their findings challenge the widely held belief that moderate drinking is beneficial to cardiovascular health and support the UK’s recently lowered guidelines.

The study compared the health and drinking habits of around 600,000 current drinkers in 19 countries worldwide and controlled for age, smoking, history of diabetes, level of education and occupation.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

Advertisements

Binge drinking could trigger abnormal heart rhythms

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Researchers who attended the annual Bavarian beer and folk festival found binge drinkers were more likely to have abnormal heart rhythm patterns.

This could be of potential concern – in extreme cases, abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) can trigger serious complications

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices                


Long-term daily drinking linked to stiffening of the arteries in men

March 17, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A UK study found men who consistently drank more than the recommended limits had signs of stiffening of the arteries, which has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease.

Researchers used data from more than 3,000 British civil servants to examine the link. Participants reported their alcohol intake over a 20-year period.

Stiffness of the arteries was also measured using a device that looks at how pressure waves move through an artery – the faster the pulse wave moves, the stiffer the arteries.

Men who were frequent heavy drinkers across the follow-up period had stiffer arteries compared with frequent moderate drinkers. There were no significant findings seen for women. The reasons for this are unclear.

While the study cannot prove cause and effect, and stiffening of the arteries can have a range of causes, it does highlight the fact alcohol-related harms can affect anyone.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices


What is preventing progress? Time to move from talk to action

November 10, 2014

Source: The Richmond Group of Charities

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: November 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report argues that tackling common risk factors such as smoking, alcohol, inactivity and unhealthy eating would drastically reduce the number of people affected by heart disease, cancer, lung disease and diabetes. The ten charities involved in the report outline nine key calls to action for politicians and decision-makers to ensure that disease prevention is at the top of the agenda.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation