Blood Pressure: How can we do better?

November 15, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  Resource

In a nutshell: To improve the detection and management of high blood pressure (BP), GPs, nurses and pharmacists of the CVD Leadership Forum have worked with the BHF and Public Health England’s (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN), Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP), Stroke Association, Blood Pressure UK and British and Irish Hypertension Society to create the ‘BP: How can we do better?’ resource.    Using data from the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Office for National Statistics (ONS) and PHE, this resource is not only a comprehensive summary of CCG-level BP care across the nation, but also provides recommendations for improving care, both at a CCG and practice level.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum

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Stress in early adulthood may lead to heighted risk of high blood pressure

February 8, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

A new study from the online journal Heart suggests a link between the tendency to become easily stressed in adolescents and a heightened risk of developing high blood pressure in later life. The research looked at more than 1.5 million 18-year-old men with normal blood pressure, who had been conscripted to the army in Sweden between 1969 and 1997 until the end of 2012 and were assessed for their levels of stress resilience. At the end of the study, those who were more prone to stress a at the age of 18 were associated with a heightened risk of high blood pressure. The study also shows an increase in the number of cases of high blood pressure, if a young person is overweight.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Joint British Societies’ consensus recommendations for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (JBS3)

April 11, 2014

Source: Heart, Volume 100, Supplement 2

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Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Review

In a nutshell: The Joint British Societies have issued their third edition (JBS3) of recommendations for preventing cardiovascular disease. As well as recommendations, there is a JBS3 risk calculator tool

Length of publication: 68 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


People with kidney disease can lower their risk of a cardiovascular event by lowering their blood pressure

December 10, 2013

Source: The George Institute for Global Health

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Date of publication: October 2013

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell:  Research has found that lowering blood pressure in people with kidney disease can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease. With kidney disease comes an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It is believed that advising people to lower their blood pressure could save many people from heart attacks and strokes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


NHS Health Check implementation review and action plan

August 9, 2013

Source: Department of Health

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Date of publication: 21st July 2013

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: A review by Public Health England has concluded that 1600 heart attacks and 4000 cases of diabetes a year could be avoided by checking the blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and lifestyle of 40-74 year olds. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, has said that 650 lives a year could be saved as a result of the NHS Health Checks. This press release by the Department of Health includes a link to a ten-point review and action plan.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Public Health England


Telemonitoring based service redesign for the management of uncontrolled hypertension

June 24, 2013

Source: BMJ, 2013, May 24th

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Date of publication: May 2013

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This community-based randomised controlled trial found that self-measurement of hypertension by patients at home with telemonitoring by practice staff was more effective in lowering daytime ambulatory blood pressure than usual care. However, an increase in the use of NHS resources was seen. The authors advise caution to those considering to roll out telemonitoring on a large scale based on the findings of this trial, as more research needs to be done to determine cost-effectiveness.

Length of publication: 18 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Hypertension: evidence update March 2013

March 18, 2013

Source: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence

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Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Practice guidelines

In a nutshell: NICE has published an evidence update on hypertension, summarising a selection of new evidence published since the last literature search. Topics include the diagnosis of hypertension, antihypertensive drug treatment and patient education.

Length of publication: 27 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Evidence