Yoga may guard against heart disease, study finds

December 19, 2014

Source: BBC News Health

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Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This news article discusses a systematic review of 37 studies, involving nearly 3000 people, which found that yoga may be beneficial for protecting against heart disease, especially for people who cannot do more vigorous forms of exercise. Yoga was independently linked to a lowering of heart risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol and obesity when compared with no exercise. The calming effect of yoga may be beneficial, as stress in linked to high blood pressure and heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BMJ

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NHS Health Check implementation review and action plan

August 9, 2013

Source: Department of Health

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Date of publication: 21st July 2013

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: A review by Public Health England has concluded that 1600 heart attacks and 4000 cases of diabetes a year could be avoided by checking the blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and lifestyle of 40-74 year olds. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, has said that 650 lives a year could be saved as a result of the NHS Health Checks. This press release by the Department of Health includes a link to a ten-point review and action plan.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Public Health England


Lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease

February 12, 2012

Source: New England Journal of Medicine, 2012, 366 (4) p. 321-9

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Date of publication: January 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This study is a meta-analysis of data from 18 cohort studies involving over 250,000 adults from the last 50 years. Participants were stratified according to blood pressure, cholesterol level, smoking and diabetes. The researchers calculated the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease according to age, sex, race and other risk factors across multiple birth cohorts. Marked differences in the lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease across risk-factor strata were observed. The authors believe that their findings have important implications for clinical disease prevention and public health practice.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


An epidemic of risk factors for cardiovascular disease

March 9, 2011

Source: The Lancet, 12 February 2011, vol 377(9765), pp 527

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Date of publication: 12 February 2011

Publication type: Editorial, Journal Article

In a nutshell: The three articles in this edition of  The Lancet have been published on behalf of the Global Burden of Metabolic Risk Factors of Chronic Diseases Collaborating Groups on BMI, blood pressure and cholesterol, respectively. They focus on national, regional and global trends in body-mass index, systolic blood pressure and serum total cholesterol 1980 – 2008, across 199 countries. An epidemic is clearly developing, but each risk factor is considered to be modifiable.

Length of publication: 1 page plus 3 related articles

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Studies prove multiple benefits of worksite health programs

June 10, 2010

Source: Medical News Today, 4th June 2010

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Date of publication: June 2010

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A 12-week worksite intervention involving twelve overweight sedentary office workers significantly improved their health and fitness. The volunteers had treadmill workstations installed in their offices for nine months. Positive outcomes included decreased waist and hip circumference and lowered cholesterol levels.
Another health study involved a larger group of workers, some of whom were normal weight and some overweight. These employees designed their own programmes, using a variety of resources such as weight-loss plans and fitness centres.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: American College of Sports Medicine