Eggs linked to heart disease and death, study suggests

May 14, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: High levels of dietary cholesterol, like those found in eggs, are linked to an increased risk of heart and circulatory disease, or even death, according to a new study published in JAMA.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Processed meats and ready meals ‘still too high in salt’

December 21, 2018

Source: BBC Health news

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: December 2018

Publication type: News

In a nutshell: There is still too much salt in processed meats such as sausages and bacon and ready meals, a Public Health England report suggests.

The groups of foods were among those that met none of the average salt targets set by PHE in 2014.

But some other foods, including breakfast cereals, baked beans and pizzas, did meet the voluntary targets.

The meat industry insisted it was “playing its part” in reducing salt in its products.

Too much salt can raise your blood pressure, which puts you at increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health news

 


Chocolate consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis of prospective studies

October 19, 2018

Source: Heart Journal

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Article (abstract)

In a nutshell: Studies investigating the impact of chocolate consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) have reached inconsistent conclusions. As such, a quantitative assessment of the dose–response association between chocolate consumption and incident CVD has not been reported. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the risk of CVD with chocolate consumption. Chocolate consumption may be associated with reduced risk of CVD at <100 g/week consumption. Higher levels may negate the health benefits and induce adverse effects associated with high sugar consumption.

Length of publication:

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Heart Journal


What are the best foods for heart health?

June 15, 2018

Source: Medical News Today

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warn that eating foods high in fat, cholesterol, or sodium can be very bad for the heart. So, when taking steps to minimize the risk of heart disease, diet is a good place to start. In this article, we examine some of the best foods for ensuring that you keep a robust and healthy heart.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Medical News Today


Embrace Mediterranean or Nordic diets to cut disease, WHO says

June 15, 2018

Source: The Guardian

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Britain could lower its rates of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease by embracing Mediterranean- or Nordic-style diets, a major study into the benefits of healthy eating suggests.

A review by the World Health Organization found compelling evidence that both diets reduce the risk of the common diseases, but noted that only 15 out of 53 countries in its European region had measures in place to promote the diets.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: The Guardian


Skipping breakfast linked to higher odds of clogged arteries

January 15, 2018

Source: Harvard Heart Health newsletter

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication:  January 2018

Publication type: Bulletin

In a nutshell:  New research supports the old adage that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. A study of more than 4,000 middle-aged adults in Spain found that those who ate breakfast were less likely to have artery-clogging plaque (atherosclerosis) than those who avoided a morning meal.

On average, the participants ate just over 2,300 calories per day. Nearly 3% didn’t eat breakfast, while about 27% ate a hearty breakfast and nearly 70% ate a skimpier breakfast. Researchers used ultrasound to check their arteries for early evidence of atherosclerosis, as they described in the October 2017 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Nearly 75% of the breakfast skippers had signs of plaque buildup, compared with 57% of those who ate a big breakfast and 64% of those who ate a lighter morning meal.

Breakfast fans tended to eat more healthfully over all and were less likely to be obese or have high blood pressure, diabetes, or unhealthy cholesterol levels. But even with those factors taken into account, skipping breakfast was still linked to a higher risk of atherosclerosis.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Harvard Heart Health newsletter


Eating too much salt is associated with risk of heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: In the study researchers assessed the relationship between salt intake and the development of heart failure.

They found that people who consumed more than 13.7 grams of salt daily had a two times higher risk of heart failure compared to those consuming less than 6.8 grams. The WHO recommends eating no more than 5 grams of salt per day.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation