What are the best foods for heart health?

June 15, 2018

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warn that eating foods high in fat, cholesterol, or sodium can be very bad for the heart. So, when taking steps to minimize the risk of heart disease, diet is a good place to start. In this article, we examine some of the best foods for ensuring that you keep a robust and healthy heart.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Medical News Today

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Embrace Mediterranean or Nordic diets to cut disease, WHO says

June 15, 2018

Source: The Guardian

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Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Britain could lower its rates of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease by embracing Mediterranean- or Nordic-style diets, a major study into the benefits of healthy eating suggests.

A review by the World Health Organization found compelling evidence that both diets reduce the risk of the common diseases, but noted that only 15 out of 53 countries in its European region had measures in place to promote the diets.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: The Guardian


Skipping breakfast linked to higher odds of clogged arteries

January 15, 2018

Source: Harvard Heart Health newsletter

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Date of publication:  January 2018

Publication type: Bulletin

In a nutshell:  New research supports the old adage that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. A study of more than 4,000 middle-aged adults in Spain found that those who ate breakfast were less likely to have artery-clogging plaque (atherosclerosis) than those who avoided a morning meal.

On average, the participants ate just over 2,300 calories per day. Nearly 3% didn’t eat breakfast, while about 27% ate a hearty breakfast and nearly 70% ate a skimpier breakfast. Researchers used ultrasound to check their arteries for early evidence of atherosclerosis, as they described in the October 2017 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Nearly 75% of the breakfast skippers had signs of plaque buildup, compared with 57% of those who ate a big breakfast and 64% of those who ate a lighter morning meal.

Breakfast fans tended to eat more healthfully over all and were less likely to be obese or have high blood pressure, diabetes, or unhealthy cholesterol levels. But even with those factors taken into account, skipping breakfast was still linked to a higher risk of atherosclerosis.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Harvard Heart Health newsletter


Eating too much salt is associated with risk of heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: In the study researchers assessed the relationship between salt intake and the development of heart failure.

They found that people who consumed more than 13.7 grams of salt daily had a two times higher risk of heart failure compared to those consuming less than 6.8 grams. The WHO recommends eating no more than 5 grams of salt per day.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Some types of vegetarian diet can raise heart disease risk

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A US study found a vegetarian diet based on less healthy food options, such as refined grains, could increase the risk of heart disease.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Low-gluten diet linked to heart attack risk

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Gluten-free diet can do more harm than good for people without coeliac disease,” The Independent reports, as a new study found that the “trendy gluten-free diets loved by Gwyneth Paltrow and Russell Crowe may increase the risk of heart disease”.  The current study followed more than 100,000 people from 1986 to 2012, assessing their diets and whether they had heart attacks during that time. These people did not have heart disease at the start of the study, and importantly did not have coeliac disease.

Overall, it found that once other risk factors were taken into account, people’s consumption of gluten was not related to their risk of heart attack. However, further analyses suggested that lower consumption of gluten specifically from whole grains (wheat, barley and rye) was associated with increased heart attack risk compared to higher consumption from these sources.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices            


Public health cuts ‘could hamper anti-obesity effort’

August 12, 2016

Source: BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Local councils in England are warning that government cuts to public health funding could hamper their efforts to tackle obesity.

Local Government Association figures show that councils will have spent £505m by 2017 on fighting obesity.

Councils use the money to measure children’s weight at primary school, help people lose weight and offer free or cheaper leisure facilities.

Public health became the responsibility of local authorities in April 2013.

Before that, it was run by the NHS.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health