Low-gluten diet linked to heart attack risk

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Gluten-free diet can do more harm than good for people without coeliac disease,” The Independent reports, as a new study found that the “trendy gluten-free diets loved by Gwyneth Paltrow and Russell Crowe may increase the risk of heart disease”.  The current study followed more than 100,000 people from 1986 to 2012, assessing their diets and whether they had heart attacks during that time. These people did not have heart disease at the start of the study, and importantly did not have coeliac disease.

Overall, it found that once other risk factors were taken into account, people’s consumption of gluten was not related to their risk of heart attack. However, further analyses suggested that lower consumption of gluten specifically from whole grains (wheat, barley and rye) was associated with increased heart attack risk compared to higher consumption from these sources.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices            


Public health cuts ‘could hamper anti-obesity effort’

August 12, 2016

Source: BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

Follow this link for full text  

Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Local councils in England are warning that government cuts to public health funding could hamper their efforts to tackle obesity.

Local Government Association figures show that councils will have spent £505m by 2017 on fighting obesity.

Councils use the money to measure children’s weight at primary school, help people lose weight and offer free or cheaper leisure facilities.

Public health became the responsibility of local authorities in April 2013.

Before that, it was run by the NHS.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health


Study finds link between saturated fats and early death

July 14, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A major study involving more than 80,000 women would seem to contradict recent high-profile reports that a diet rich in saturated fat is safe.

The latest – a long-term study conducted in the US including more than 120,000 people – found that swapping saturated fat and / or trans fats for polyunsaturated fat such as olive oil could reduce the risk of dying by 27%.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Study says there’s no link between cholesterol and heart disease

July 14, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: June 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Controversial report claims there’s no link between ‘bad cholesterol’ and heart disease,” the Daily Mail reports, while The Times states: “Bad cholesterol ‘helps you live longer’,”.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Is a pint of beer a day good for the heart?

June 13, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – behind the headlines

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: June 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers reviewed the existing evidence about beer and health, including the effects on heart and circulation, cancer, liver disease, dementia and overall length of life.  They say that much research has been done of the effects of wine on health, but less on beer.

The research team claims that, based on the result of their review, men who drink the equivalent of around two 330ml cans of beer a day, and women who drink one can will receive “some benefit against cardiovascular disease”.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – behind the headlines


Mediterranean diet best for heart disease (but some junk food won’t hurt)

May 9, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  “People with heart disease have a lower risk of heart attack and strokes if they eat a Mediterranean-style diet”. After recruiting more than 15,000 people with heart disease from 39 countries, researchers scored their diets for Mediterranean elements such as eating plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish, some alcohol, and some meat. They also scored diets for Western diet elements, such as consumption of refined grains, sweets and desserts, sugared drinks, and deep-fried foods.

After an average of 3.7 years, death, non-fatal heart attack or stroke occurred in 7.3% of people with a Mediterranean score of 15 or more – about 3% less than those scoring 14 or below (around 10%).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Study argues ditching butter for veg oil won’t prevent heart disease

April 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: April 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  “Ditching butter for veg oil may not be better for heart”.  An analysis of previously unpublished data from the 1960s and 70s found no benefit in replacing sources of saturated fats with vegetable oils.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines