Fitness predicts long-term survival after a cardiovascular event

January 5, 2016

Source: BMJ Open

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Date of publication: 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  The objective of this study was to identify the role of fitness, fitness change, body mass index and other factors in predicting long-term (>5 years) survival in patients with coronary heart disease. Prior fitness and fitness improvement are strong predictors of long-term survival in patients who have experienced a cardiac event or procedure. Some secondary prevention medications make a significant contribution to reducing all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. This study supports public health messages promoting fitness for life.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  BMJ Open

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One in five people will develop heart failure. Many cases of heart failure are preventable with healthy lifestyles

June 11, 2015

Source: European Society of Cardiology (ESC)

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Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable.  It feels as if every breath in and out is through a narrow straw.  The Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) is calling for greater public awareness of heart failure symptoms

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: European Society of Cardiology (ESC)


Raising the Heartbeat of the Nation: A five-step plan for a more active population

March 6, 2015

Source: Sport and Recreation Alliance

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  In the run up to the election the Sport and Recreation Alliance want to highlight the additional benefits the sector has to the health of the nation on a physical, social and economic scale. This Minister’s To-Do List offers, to any future government, a concise, easily understandable programme from those within sport and recreation which, if implemented fully, would remove some of the obstacles that currently stop sector from realising its full potential.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Sedentary periods increase risk of early death regardless of exercise

February 9, 2015

Source: Science Daily

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Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  New research has found that the amount of time a person is sedentary during the day is associated with an increased risk of heart disease regardless of regular exercise. A meta analysis found that the longer a person was sedentary, the stronger the negative effects on health. Dr Alter, author of the study, suggests that moving for one to three minutes every half an hour could be beneficial.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  UK Health Forum


Two thirds unaware of healthy calorie intake

January 14, 2015

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A new poll from the British Heart Foundation (BHF), Diabetes UK and Tesco has found that about two thirds of people do not know how many calories the average person needs to maintain a healthy weight.  Only 35 percent of respondents knew the average man needed 2,500 calories per day and 37 percent were aware that the average woman needed 2,000 calories.  Simon Gillespie, Chief Executive of BHF said: “These figures are deeply concerning and highlight our confusion about calories.  Eating too much of any food increases the chances of becoming obese, a risk factor for coronary heart disease, which is the UK’s single biggest killer.”

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Lifestyle for relevant to heart disease than genetics

November 10, 2014

Source:  The Telegraph

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Doctors from the Intermountain Medical Centre Heart Institute, in the US have found lifestyle factors are more accurate at predicting risk of cardiac arrest than genetics history. The researchers said that although having a genetic predisposition to heart disease did increase a persons risk, having a small genetic risk could become significant if the person led an unhealthy lifestyle.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


People show greater resolve to improve health if given their ‘heart age’

March 7, 2014

Source: European Journal of Preventative Cardiology

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Date of publication: February 2014

Publication type: Randomized Controlled Trial

In a nutshell: Researchers have found that informing patients of their heart age compared to just their percentage risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) was more effective in changing behaviour and lifestyle choices. The Heart Age Calculator uses the same risk factor data as the percentage risk score but presents it’s as an age compared with the persons actual age.

Length of publication:

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum