Processed meats and ready meals ‘still too high in salt’

December 21, 2018

Source: BBC Health news

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: December 2018

Publication type: News

In a nutshell: There is still too much salt in processed meats such as sausages and bacon and ready meals, a Public Health England report suggests.

The groups of foods were among those that met none of the average salt targets set by PHE in 2014.

But some other foods, including breakfast cereals, baked beans and pizzas, did meet the voluntary targets.

The meat industry insisted it was “playing its part” in reducing salt in its products.

Too much salt can raise your blood pressure, which puts you at increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health news

 

Advertisements

High blood pressure smoking and diabetes increase heart attack risk more in women than in men

December 21, 2018

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: November 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A study published in the BMJ reveals some risk factors have a greater impact on heart attack risk in women than they do in men.

Overall, men are at greater risk of heart attack than women, but several studies have suggested that certain risk factors have more of an impact on the risk in women than in men. To look more closely at this association, researchers at Oxford University looked at data on almost half a million people enrolled in the UK Biobank – a database of biological information from British adults. The 471,998 people had no history of cardiovascular disease, were aged 40 to 69 years and 56% of them were women.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


New research at the University of Manchester identifies two genes linked to a serious congenital heart condition

December 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: November 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Scientists at the University of Manchester have published a paper showing for the first time, the possible genetic causes of a serious congenital heart condition, Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF).

People born with ToF have four specific structural abnormalities in the heart, which mean they often have to undergo open heart surgery early in life. Many patients will have several surgeries and procedures throughout their lifetime. ToF is a very complex congenital heart condition, and in the majority of cases the cause is unknown.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Chocolate consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis of prospective studies

October 19, 2018

Source: Heart Journal

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Article (abstract)

In a nutshell: Studies investigating the impact of chocolate consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) have reached inconsistent conclusions. As such, a quantitative assessment of the dose–response association between chocolate consumption and incident CVD has not been reported. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the risk of CVD with chocolate consumption. Chocolate consumption may be associated with reduced risk of CVD at <100 g/week consumption. Higher levels may negate the health benefits and induce adverse effects associated with high sugar consumption.

Length of publication:

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Heart Journal


Increased vascular endothelial growth factor D is associated with atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke

October 19, 2018

Source: Heart Journal

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Article (abstract)

In a nutshell: Increased VEGF-D concentrations were associated with AF and ischaemic stroke. The relationship with ischaemic stroke was more pronounced in subjects with a diagnosis of AF.

Length of publication:

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Heart Journal


New 20 minute test diagnoses hidden heart condition

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New tests can diagnose ‘hidden’ heart diseases – such as microvascular angina – caused by problems with the small blood vessels supplying the heart, according to research funded by us and presented at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference today in San Diego. The new tests are not yet standard in the NHS because, before now, there has not been enough evidence gathered about whether they would benefit patients. Now, researchers say that they should be routinely available to pinpoint the cause of chest pain.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Genetic tool to predict adult heart attack risk in childhood

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: People at high risk of a heart attack in adulthood could be spotted much earlier in life with a one-off DNA test, according to new research. An international team led by researchers from the University of Leicester, University of Cambridge and the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia used UK Biobank data to develop and test a powerful scoring system, called a Genomic Risk Score (GRS) which can identify people who are at risk of developing coronary heart disease prematurely because of their genetics.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation