Air pollution spikes cause hundreds more cardiac arrests and strokes in the UK

November 19, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Hundreds of cardiac arrests and strokes in the UK are likely to be caused by sudden spikes in air pollution, according to new research by a team at King’s College London. The evidence suggests that days when pollutants were in the top half of the annual range, there were on average an extra 124 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. In addition, across the nine cities where data were collected, there were an average of 231 additional hospital admissions due to stroke on these same days.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Heart failure hospital admissions rise by a third in five years

November 19, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: November 2019

Publication type: Statistics

In a nutshell: Heart failure admissions have reached record levels in England, rising from 65,025 in 2013/14 to 86,474 in 2018/19 – a 33 per cent increase. This is three times as fast as all other hospital admissions, which have risen by 11 per cent in the same period. The rise in hospital admissions is reflective of increasing numbers of people living with heart failure in the UK. It’s estimated that around 920,000 people have the condition and it’s placing a greater burden on the health service than the four most common cancers combined. With heart failure patients staying in hospital for around 10 days – double the average of five days for all diagnoses – this is putting immense pressure on the NHS.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Pacemaker study to help heart patients avoid hospital

November 19, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: November 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A study at The University of Manchester which will analyse heart patients’ activity levels through their pacemakers, to determine which people are at the highest risk of frailty and help them avoid long hospital stays.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Does more leg fat protect women against heart attack and stroke?

August 16, 2019

Source: NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Researchers looked at the body composition of 2,683 women in the US who were a healthy weight and had been through the menopause.

They found women who had a higher percentage of fat around their trunk were more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than women who had more fat on their legs, but less around their upper body.

Because of the nature of the study, we cannot be sure that body fat distribution directly caused the differences in risk of having a heart attack and stroke.

But previous studies have found people who are “apple-shaped” with more central body fat have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than those who are “pear-shaped”.

Scientists think this may be because fat on the legs is a harmless way of storing energy, while fat around the abdominal organs may affect metabolism and put people at risk of diabetes.

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Acknowledgement:   NHS News – Behind the Headlines


Potential new heart attack treatment

May 14, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Scientists have found a potential new drug for treating the heart damage caused by a heart attack by targeting the way the heart reacts to stress. The research team, led by BHF Professor Michael Schneider at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, used stem cells to grow heart tissue and mimic a ‘heart attack in a dish’, and were able to block the chemical signals within heart muscle that lead to cell death and heart damage.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


E-cigarettes linked to heart attacks, coronary artery disease and depression

May 14, 2019

Source: Science Daily

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Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that adults who report puffing e-cigarettes, or vaping, are significantly more likely to have a heart attack, coronary artery disease and depression compared with those who don’t use them or any tobacco products.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement:   Science Daily


Statins reduce heart attack and stroke risk in older people

February 28, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: According to new research that we part-funded, statins lower the risk of heart attack and stroke in all ages, including older people over the age of 75. The study was published in The Lancet. This new study also revealed that statin therapy did not increase the risk of deaths from diseases not linked to the heart, including cancer.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation