Eating too much salt is associated with risk of heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: In the study researchers assessed the relationship between salt intake and the development of heart failure.

They found that people who consumed more than 13.7 grams of salt daily had a two times higher risk of heart failure compared to those consuming less than 6.8 grams. The WHO recommends eating no more than 5 grams of salt per day.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

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‘Exercise pill’ could potentially help people with heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: One of the causes of heart failure is cardiomyopathy, which is when the heart muscle has become stretched, thickened or stiff.

Researchers wanted to see if a protein called cardiotrophin 1 could help stimulate the growth of new muscle cells.

The study found the protein promoted heart cell growth, similar to the way exercise increases heart strength. The effect of the protein was also reversible, as are the effects of exercise.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


Research shows broken heart syndrome causes long lasting heart damage

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A condition once thought to temporarily cause heart failure in people who experience severe stress might actually cause longer-lasting damage to the heart muscle, according to new research that we’ve funded.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Iron deficiency in heart failure patients contributes to poor outcomes

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Patients admitted with acute heart failure who exhibit iron deficiency (ID) tend to have a longer and more expensive hospital stay and a greater likelihood of readmission, according to analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) conference in Manchester.   The research, which looked at data over three consecutive years, showed that 14 per cent of patients with heart failure also had ID as a secondary diagnosis, and that hospital spells for these patients were significantly more costly than those without ID.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


Beta-blockers ‘useless’ for many heart attack patients, study reports

June 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Many patients given beta blockers after a heart attack may not benefit from being on the drugs, suggesting they may be being overprescribed,” The Guardian reports.

Beta-blockers are drugs used to regulate the heart by making it beat more slowly and with less force. They are often used in people who have heart failure or are thought to be at risk of heart failure.

A new study has collected data from England and Wales from more than 170,000 people who had a heart attack but did not have heart failure. The researchers wanted to see if beta-blockers improved health outcomes in this set of patients.

The study compared mortality rates between those who were prescribed beta blockers and those who weren’t when they were discharged from hospital. Though there were fewer deaths one year later among people prescribed beta blockers (5% vs. 11%), the researchers concluded that beta blockers did not affect risk of death once other risk factors and medications were taken into consideration.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines                


Ibuprofen linked to increased risk of heart attacks

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Researchers looked at data from 446,763 people and found some evidence that all commonly-used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) appear to increase the risk of heart attack, and that the risk rises in the first week of use. The study found the risk was highest with higher doses.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices