Does more leg fat protect women against heart attack and stroke?

August 16, 2019

Source: NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Researchers looked at the body composition of 2,683 women in the US who were a healthy weight and had been through the menopause.

They found women who had a higher percentage of fat around their trunk were more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than women who had more fat on their legs, but less around their upper body.

Because of the nature of the study, we cannot be sure that body fat distribution directly caused the differences in risk of having a heart attack and stroke.

But previous studies have found people who are “apple-shaped” with more central body fat have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than those who are “pear-shaped”.

Scientists think this may be because fat on the legs is a harmless way of storing energy, while fat around the abdominal organs may affect metabolism and put people at risk of diabetes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Potential new heart attack treatment

May 14, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Scientists have found a potential new drug for treating the heart damage caused by a heart attack by targeting the way the heart reacts to stress. The research team, led by BHF Professor Michael Schneider at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, used stem cells to grow heart tissue and mimic a ‘heart attack in a dish’, and were able to block the chemical signals within heart muscle that lead to cell death and heart damage.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


E-cigarettes linked to heart attacks, coronary artery disease and depression

May 14, 2019

Source: Science Daily

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Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that adults who report puffing e-cigarettes, or vaping, are significantly more likely to have a heart attack, coronary artery disease and depression compared with those who don’t use them or any tobacco products.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement:   Science Daily


Statins reduce heart attack and stroke risk in older people

February 28, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: According to new research that we part-funded, statins lower the risk of heart attack and stroke in all ages, including older people over the age of 75. The study was published in The Lancet. This new study also revealed that statin therapy did not increase the risk of deaths from diseases not linked to the heart, including cancer.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Heart failure survival rates stubbornly low

February 28, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Survival after a diagnosis of heart failure in the United Kingdom has shown only modest improvement in the 21st century and lags behind other serious conditions, such as cancer, finds a large study published by The BMJ today. The findings also show that survival is worse for people requiring admission to hospital around the time of diagnosis, and for those in the most deprived groups.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Smoking and alcohol affect teenagers’ artery health

December 21, 2018

Source: NHS Health news

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Date of publication: 2018

Publication type: News

In a nutshell: “Teenagers who drink [alcohol] and smoke even moderate amounts can suffer stiffening arteries by the age of 17, a new study has found”.

Stiffening of the arteries doesn’t usually cause any noticeable symptoms, but is a possible indicator of future vascular problems such as high blood pressure and heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement:   NHS Health news


Antibodies cut heart attack risk

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Specific antibodies could protect against heart attacks, according to a study published in the journal EBioMedicine. Researchers from Imperial College London studied patients with high blood pressure of whom 87 had developed coronary heart disease (CHD) in one study in collaboration with Lund University in Sweden. They also studied another 143 patients who had their heart arteries extensively studied using cutting edge techniques in collaboration with researchers from the Thorax centre in Holland.

They found that those who had heart attacks in the first study, as well as those whose arteries had unstable fatty plaques in the second study had much lower levels of an antibody called IgM anti MDA-LDL. Those who had the highest levels, were well protected from developing dangerous plaques in their arteries, with around a 70 per cent less chance of developing heart disease over nearly five years from one of the studies.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation