Statins cut heart deaths in men by 28%, study finds

November 7, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Statins cut the risk of dying from heart disease by 28% among men, according to the longest study of its kind,” The Guardian reports.

Statins help reduce the level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad cholesterol”, in the blood. This in turn helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Current UK guidelines recommend that people with a 1 in 10 chance of developing CVD at some point in the next 10 years should be offered statins.

The results of this new analysis led the researchers to conclude that more people with high cholesterol should be offered statins.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Scan could help prevent deadly heart failure in cancer patients

November 7, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: High-tech scanning techniques could reveal whether chemotherapy is damaging a person’s heart before any symptoms appear, according to research we’ve funded presented at the Global Cardio-oncology Summit in London.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Eating too much salt is associated with risk of heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: In the study researchers assessed the relationship between salt intake and the development of heart failure.

They found that people who consumed more than 13.7 grams of salt daily had a two times higher risk of heart failure compared to those consuming less than 6.8 grams. The WHO recommends eating no more than 5 grams of salt per day.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


‘Exercise pill’ could potentially help people with heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: One of the causes of heart failure is cardiomyopathy, which is when the heart muscle has become stretched, thickened or stiff.

Researchers wanted to see if a protein called cardiotrophin 1 could help stimulate the growth of new muscle cells.

The study found the protein promoted heart cell growth, similar to the way exercise increases heart strength. The effect of the protein was also reversible, as are the effects of exercise.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


Research shows broken heart syndrome causes long lasting heart damage

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A condition once thought to temporarily cause heart failure in people who experience severe stress might actually cause longer-lasting damage to the heart muscle, according to new research that we’ve funded.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Iron deficiency in heart failure patients contributes to poor outcomes

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Patients admitted with acute heart failure who exhibit iron deficiency (ID) tend to have a longer and more expensive hospital stay and a greater likelihood of readmission, according to analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) conference in Manchester.   The research, which looked at data over three consecutive years, showed that 14 per cent of patients with heart failure also had ID as a secondary diagnosis, and that hospital spells for these patients were significantly more costly than those without ID.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation