Long working week ‘may increase risk of irregular heartbeat’

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Long working days can cause heart problems, study says,” The Guardian reports.

Researchers found people who work 55 or more hours a week had an increased risk of developing a type of irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, where the heart can beat very fast.

Complications of atrial fibrillation include stroke and heart failure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


People who are ‘healthy’ obese are at risk of heart disease

May 18, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that so called ‘metabolically healthy’ obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure or stroke, than normal weight people.

The study, presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO), examined whether the risk of developing cardiovascular conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure, was different for normal weight people with no metabolic conditions or people with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


New report assesses impact of physical inactivity on UK heart health and economy

April 24, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: A report by the British Heart Foundation finds that more than 20 million adults in the UK are physically inactive and estimates that this increase risk of heart disease may cost the NHS £1.2 billion annually.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  British Heart Foundation              


Increasing Physical Activity and Decreasing Sedentary Behaviour in the Workplace

February 14, 2017

Source: Alberta Centre for Active Living

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: The Alberta Centre for Active Living completed a systematic review on workplace interventions that focus on increasing physical activity, reducing sedentary behaviour, or both.    The purpose of this project was to:  •describe the most effective workplace interventions at increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behaviour,  •identify tools to assist with the implementation of workplace interventions, and  •provide general recommendations to workplaces and workplace champions on developing and maintaining a workplace that moves more and sits less.

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Acknowledgement: Alberta Centre for Active Living


A pattern of brain activity may link stress to heart attacks

February 14, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  “The effect of constant stress on a deep-lying region of the brain explains the increased risk of heart attack, a study in The Lancet suggests,” BBC News reports.

Research suggests that stress stimulates the amygdala. The amygdala is, in evolutionary terms, one of the oldest areas of the brain and has been linked to some of the most primal types of emotion, such as fear and stress. It is thought to be responsible for triggering the classic “fight or flight” response in situations of potential danger.

Researchers in the US, using medical imaging, found that higher levels of activity in the amygdala predicted how likely people were to have a heart attack or stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Smoking could cause disease in more than 1.3 million over the next 20 years

May 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:  This study examined the effect of future trends in smoking prevalence on incidence of non-communicable disease such as cancer, coronary heart disease, COPD and stroke. It updates and builds on previous studies to review the latest trends in smoking prevalence to predict prevalence in twenty years.

Length of publication: 21 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense

February 8, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:

A new report from the UK Health Forum and Cancer Research UK has found that rising rates of obesity and overweight could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. This would cost the NHS an additional £2.5 billion a year by 2035 over and above what is already spent on obesity related disease. The study shows that a one per cent reduction in the number overweight or obese people every year could prevent more than 64,000 cancer cases over the next 20 years and save the NHS £300 million in 2035 alone.

Length of publication: 36 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum