Worrying about work out-of-hours ‘may be bad for the heart’

March 17, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A small study of London-based office workers found those who reported being frequently troubled by work-related issues had patterns of heart activity associated with stress and anxiety.

Researchers interviewed 195 adults aged between 20 and 62 (70% male) about what they termed work-related rumination.

This was defined as how often a person was troubled by work-related issues when they weren’t at work, measured on a scale of one (never/seldom) to five (very often/always).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices


How to manage and reduce stress

December 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Research has shown that stress can sometimes be positive. It makes us more alert and helps us perform better in certain situations. However, stress has only been found as beneficial if it is short-lived. Excessive or prolonged stress can contribute to illness such as heart disease and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Worrying about health linked to heart disease

November 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Worried well ‘make themselves sick’,” reports The Daily Telegraph.

Several other news outlets covered the same story with headlines about how the “worried well” may be more likely to develop heart disease.

The stories are based on a Norwegian population study with 7,052 participants that aimed to see whether health anxiety (hypochondria) was linked with the development of heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


Failure to deal with long-term health problems ‘costs NHS £13bn a year’

February 14, 2012

Source: The Guardian

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Date of publication: February 2012

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A new report published by the King’s Fund: ‘Longterm conditions and mental health – the cost of co-morbidities’ has found that those suffering with conditions such as heart disease are two to three times more likely to suffer mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, costing up to 45% more to treat. The King’s Fund states that there has been a failure in identifying problems and providing support. Mental health provision should not be ‘tacked on to physical care’ but should play an integral part. It warns that the number of people with co-morbid longterm physical and mental health problems is expected to rise by a third over the next decade. The report makes a number of recommendations to improve integration between chronic disease management, primary care services and mental health support.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement: The King’s Fund


All you have to do is call; a pilot study to improve the outcomes of patients with coronary artery disease

August 13, 2009

Source: Applied Nursing Research, 2009, 22 (2) p. 133-137

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Date of publication: May, 2009

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: A pilot study in Canada assessed the potential benefit of providing follow-up information about mental health resources to patients who had received cardiac catheterisation and were suffering from depression. Half the participants were contacted by mail, and half were contacted through a follow-up telephone call by a nurse. Both groups received information on community and hospital-based mental health resources. The results showed that early recognition strategies and referral protocols are effective in decreasing symptoms of depression in patients with coronary artery disease.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.