Energy drinks cause heart problems

September 3, 2014

Source: EurekAlert

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: French research has found that consumption of energy drinks increased by 30% between 2009 and 2011, with some people drinking several drinks in quick succession during physical exercise. This had sometimes led to adverse conditions such as angina, tachycardia and other cardiac conditions.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: European Society of Cardiology


Prospective study of breakfast eating and incident coronary heart disease

August 9, 2013

Source: Circulation, 2013, 128 (4) p. 337-343

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Date of publication: July 2013

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: The purpose of this research was to examine eating habits and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). More than 25,000 men without cardiovascular disease participated in the study, and were followed up over 16 years. Men who did not eat breakfast had a 27% higher risk of developing CHD than men who ate breakfast.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Shift work and vascular events: systematic review and meta-analysis

August 15, 2012

Source: BMJ, 2012, early online

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Date of publication: July 2012

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell: This research reviewed 34 studies. Shift work was associated with myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke, while all shift work schedules apart from evening shifts were associated with a statistically higher risk of coronary events. The reviewers conclude that there may be implications for public policy and occupational medicine.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.