High BMI and blood pressure create a heavy heart

November 7, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Being overweight or obese creates damaging changes to the structure of the heart, according to new research we’ve part-funded published in the scientific journal PLoS ONE today. The new research uses UK Biobank data to reveal – for the first time – the direct damage that carrying extra weight has on the heart’s weight and size, and implicates a range of other modifiable risk factors including high blood pressure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


People who are ‘healthy’ obese are at risk of heart disease

May 18, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that so called ‘metabolically healthy’ obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure or stroke, than normal weight people.

The study, presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO), examined whether the risk of developing cardiovascular conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure, was different for normal weight people with no metabolic conditions or people with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


Obesity linked to premature death, with greatest effect in men

August 12, 2016

Source: Medical News Today www.medicalnewstoday.com

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A study of 3.9 million adults published in The Lancet finds that being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of premature death. The risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory disease and cancer are all increased. Overall, the excess risk of premature death (before age 70) among those who are overweight or obese is about three times as great in men as in women.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    Medical News Today www.medicalnewstoday.com


Public health cuts ‘could hamper anti-obesity effort’

August 12, 2016

Source: BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Local councils in England are warning that government cuts to public health funding could hamper their efforts to tackle obesity.

Local Government Association figures show that councils will have spent £505m by 2017 on fighting obesity.

Councils use the money to measure children’s weight at primary school, help people lose weight and offer free or cheaper leisure facilities.

Public health became the responsibility of local authorities in April 2013.

Before that, it was run by the NHS.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health


Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense

March 14, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:

A report from the UKHF and CRUK has found that rising rates of obesity and overweight could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 Diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. The report calls on the Government to act now by introducing a tax on sugary drinks and a 9pm watershed ban on TV advertising of junk food as part of its childhood obesity strategy.

Length of publication: 36 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense

February 8, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:

A new report from the UK Health Forum and Cancer Research UK has found that rising rates of obesity and overweight could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. This would cost the NHS an additional £2.5 billion a year by 2035 over and above what is already spent on obesity related disease. The study shows that a one per cent reduction in the number overweight or obese people every year could prevent more than 64,000 cancer cases over the next 20 years and save the NHS £300 million in 2035 alone.

Length of publication: 36 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Normal BMI with a big belly ‘deadlier than obesity’

January 5, 2016

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A major new study tracked more than 15,000 adults to look at the effect of body size on mortality. Researchers found that people with a normal BMI but a large WHR had increased risk of dying during follow-up compared to people with a smaller WHR. This included people of similar BMI, and also people who were overweight or obese, but with a smaller WHR. One hypothesis is that having a big belly increases the amount of fat inside the abdomen (visceral fat). This may then cause inflammation to the vital organs stored inside the abdomen, which possibly makes people vulnerable to chronic diseases.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices


Study suggests people who have had heart attacks and are overweight could live longer than healthy people

June 11, 2015

Source: The Independent

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Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The findings from a study carried out by University of Oxford, indicate that the body fat of a person can be beneficial when having a heart attack or stroke. This due to the series of chemicals released from certain body fats in the event of a heart attack or stroke. The release of these chemicals is in response to warnings which are sent out by the heart and surrounding arteries.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Health Forum UK


Children of obese mothers more likely to develop heart disease

March 6, 2015

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The latest findings from the Dorian project has found that children of obese mothers are more likely to develop heart disease, have a stroke or develop type 2 diabetes. Based on the current findings, researchers say urgent strategies are required to prevent girls and young women becoming obese.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  UK Health Forum


Yoga may guard against heart disease, study finds

December 19, 2014

Source: BBC News Health

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Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This news article discusses a systematic review of 37 studies, involving nearly 3000 people, which found that yoga may be beneficial for protecting against heart disease, especially for people who cannot do more vigorous forms of exercise. Yoga was independently linked to a lowering of heart risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol and obesity when compared with no exercise. The calming effect of yoga may be beneficial, as stress in linked to high blood pressure and heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement: BMJ


Obesity and fitness: The relation between obesity, cardiorespiratory fitness and mortality

December 11, 2014

Source: Public Health England

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Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Briefing paper

In a nutshell: This paper presents recent review-level evidence behind the relation between obesity, cardiovascular fitness and mortality, and briefly explores the main public health implications.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Obese children can begin to show signs of future heart problems

November 10, 2014

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: October 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers from the University of Leipzig have found they could detect possible heart problems in obese children and teenagers. Using an ultrasound, researchers were able to assess blood flow through the valves and chambers of the heart and found changes in the shape and function in the hearts of children who were obese compared with those within normal weight boundaries. Further research is needed to find out if the changes to the heart are reversible and the predictive value of these cardiovascular changes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Uk Health Forum