Diabetes drug could help millions with heart and circulatory disease

June 15, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New research has found that metformin – a cheap drug routinely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes – could help millions of people living with heart and circulatory disease in the UK.

Two studies involving the drug, led by Dr Ify Mordi and colleagues at the University of Dundee, at the University of Dundee and presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference in Manchester, have provided promising results for patients with high blood pressure-induced heart damage and a condition called aortic stenosis, which causes heart failure.

The BHF-funded MET-REMODEL trial, found that metformin could reverse harmful thickening of the left ventricle – the heart’s main pumping chamber. It also helped to bring down high blood pressure and reduce body weight in patients who had a heart attack.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

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Embrace Mediterranean or Nordic diets to cut disease, WHO says

June 15, 2018

Source: The Guardian

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Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Britain could lower its rates of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease by embracing Mediterranean- or Nordic-style diets, a major study into the benefits of healthy eating suggests.

A review by the World Health Organization found compelling evidence that both diets reduce the risk of the common diseases, but noted that only 15 out of 53 countries in its European region had measures in place to promote the diets.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: The Guardian


Research highlights the urgent need for better diagnosis of deadly inherited heart conditions

June 15, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New figures we’ve released today show that people with potentially deadly inherited heart conditions are too often not diagnosed until a life-threatening cardiac arrest or sudden death in the family. Our survey of almost 200 people with inherited heart conditions from across the UK found that one in six (16%) people with a deadly inherited heart condition are only diagnosed after having a cardiac arrest, whilst a fifth (18%) of people are diagnosed after a sudden death in the family.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Tests can give families of SADS victims a lifesaving diagnosis

June 15, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A study published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology suggests a series of investigative tests should be carried out on the loved ones of SADS victims, to try and diagnose an underlying hidden heart condition and protect them from another tragedy.

The series of tests include an ECG, echocardiogram, exercise test and the ajmaline provocation test – a procedure used to reveal abnormal electrical activity in the heart.

The researchers, based at St George’s University of London, evaluated over 300 families who had lost a relative to SADS over a 10-year period. The team looked at 911 relatives in total and 22% of them were diagnosed with an inherited cardiac condition. The most common condition found in families was Brugada syndrome, affecting 16% of all relatives.

Brugada syndrome is a rare inherited heart rhythm disturbance that restricts the flow of sodium ions into the heart cells. If diagnosed, people with Brugada syndrome can be treated with medications or fitted with an ICD, to shock the heart back into rhythm if it stops.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Seven ways … to lower your heart age

February 22, 2018

Source: The Guardian

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Date of publication: January 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Article about how you can lower your risk of heart attack or stroke, at any age.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: The Guardian


Health Economic Evaluation of Primary Prevention Strategies Against Cardiovascular Disease

February 22, 2018

Source: PubMed

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Date of publication: January 2018

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has for decades been the most common cause of death in Norway and most other Western countries. Several groups of drugs have shown in clinical trials to prevent CVD. In this report, we have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these drugs.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library

Acknowledgement: PubMed


Middle-aged can reverse heart risk with exercise, study suggests

January 15, 2018

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: January 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  The study, published in the journal Circulation, analysed the hearts of 53 adults aged 45-64 who were healthy but had no history of exercising regularly.

Research has shown that sedentary behaviours – such as sitting or reclining for long periods of time – increase the risk of heart disease.

The study’s participants were divided into two groups, with one following an aerobic exercise routine that progressed in intensity over the two years and another doing yoga, balance training and weight training three times a week, also for two years.

The aerobic exercise group showed an 18% improvement in their maximum oxygen intake during exercise and a more than 25% improvement in “plasticity” in the left ventricular muscle of the heart – both markers of a healthier heart.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  BBC Health News