PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease

May 18, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Review

In a nutshell: Over short-term to medium-term follow-up, PCSK9 inhibitors reduced LDL-C. Studies with medium-term follow-up time (longest median follow-up recorded was 26 months) reported that PCSK9 inhibitors (compared with placebo) decreased CVD risk but may have increased the risk of any adverse events (driven by SPIRE-1 and -2 trials). Available evidence suggests that PCSK9 inhibitor use probably leads to little or no difference in mortality. Evidence on relative efficacy and safety when PCSK9 inhibitors were compared with active treatments was of low to very low quality (GRADE); follow-up times were short and events were few. Large trials with longer follow-up are needed to evaluate PCSK9 inhibitors versus active treatments as well as placebo. Owing to the predominant inclusion of high-risk patients in these studies, applicability of results to primary prevention is limited. Finally, estimated risk differences indicate that PCSK9 inhibitors only modestly change absolute risks (often to less than 1%).

Length of publication: 111 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  Cochrane Library                


Cycling commuters have lower rates of heart disease and cancer

April 24, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Want to live longer? Reduce your risk of cancer? And heart disease? Then cycle to work,” BBC News advises, prompted by a new study that found UK commuters who cycled to work had lower rates of cancer and heart disease, compared to other types of commuters.

The study was well designed as it included more than 200,000 adults working full time away from their homes and aged between 40 and 69 years. Commuting on a bicycle was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular diseasecancer and death from any cause, while those walking to work only had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices              


Vitamin C supplementation for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

April 24, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: Vitamin C is an essential micronutrient and powerful antioxidant. Observational studies have shown an inverse relationship between vitamin C intake and major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Results from clinical trials are less consistent. This review aims to determine the effectiveness of vitamin C supplementation as a single supplement for the primary prevention of CVD.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Cochrane Library              


Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

February 14, 2017

Source: Circulation

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Scientific Statement

In a nutshell: Discusses the cardiometabolic health effects of eating patterns: skipping breakfast, intermittent fasting, meal frequency (number of daily eating occasions), and timing of eating and propose definitions for meals, snacks, and eating occasions for use in research.

Length of publication: 27 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    Circulation


Handful of nuts ‘cuts heart disease and cancer’ risk

January 10, 2017

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication:  December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers found consistent evidence that a 28 gram daily serving of nuts – which is literally a handful (for most nuts) – was linked with around 20% reduced risk of heart disease, cancer and death from any cause.  However, as is so often the case with studies into diet and health, the researchers cannot prove nuts are the sole cause of these outcomes.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


‘Not enough over-50s’ taking aspirin to prevent heart disease

January 10, 2017

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication:  December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  U.S. researchers ran a simulation of what might happen if all Americans over 50 years old took aspirin on a daily basis. Their results found that people would live about four months longer on average, adding 900,000 people to the US population by 2036.

The study was designed to demonstrate the possible long-term effects of more people taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


Genetic link to dangerous aneurysms could aid future treatment

December 9, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Thousands of lives could be saved every year after it was discovered a fatal cardiovascular condition could be linked to four genes, according to Leicester research we helped fund.

A 10-year project, led by Professor Matt Bown, looked at 10,000 people worldwide and found those who had suffered an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) had four genes in common.

It is hoped that the findings, published in the journal Circulation Research, could help doctors understand more about the condition, which can lead to fatal internal bleeding if left untreated.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation