Early gene-editing success holds promise for preventing inherited heart diseases

August 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Scientists have, for the first time, used gene-editing to correct the genetic mutation for a heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).  This new advance could mean that it would be possible to correct the defect at the earliest stage of embryonic development so that the defect would not be passed on to future generations.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


New hope to prevent dangerous blood clots found in the legs

August 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Common anti-allergy medicines could prove to be effective treatment for potentially fatal blood clots in the legs, according to new research we funded. The findings, published in the journal Circulation Research, may pave the way for new medicines to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) – a health issue that can be a particular problem on long-haul flights or other situations related to long-term immobilization.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


More older adults ‘may benefit from taking statins,’ study reports

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Nearly all men over 60 and women over 75 eligible for statins, analysis suggests,” The Guardian reports.

This is the finding of a study that aimed to see how many people in England would qualify for statin use if the 2014 NICE guidelines for statin therapy in adults were followed.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease

May 18, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Review

In a nutshell: Over short-term to medium-term follow-up, PCSK9 inhibitors reduced LDL-C. Studies with medium-term follow-up time (longest median follow-up recorded was 26 months) reported that PCSK9 inhibitors (compared with placebo) decreased CVD risk but may have increased the risk of any adverse events (driven by SPIRE-1 and -2 trials). Available evidence suggests that PCSK9 inhibitor use probably leads to little or no difference in mortality. Evidence on relative efficacy and safety when PCSK9 inhibitors were compared with active treatments was of low to very low quality (GRADE); follow-up times were short and events were few. Large trials with longer follow-up are needed to evaluate PCSK9 inhibitors versus active treatments as well as placebo. Owing to the predominant inclusion of high-risk patients in these studies, applicability of results to primary prevention is limited. Finally, estimated risk differences indicate that PCSK9 inhibitors only modestly change absolute risks (often to less than 1%).

Length of publication: 111 pages

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Acknowledgement:  Cochrane Library                


Cycling commuters have lower rates of heart disease and cancer

April 24, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Want to live longer? Reduce your risk of cancer? And heart disease? Then cycle to work,” BBC News advises, prompted by a new study that found UK commuters who cycled to work had lower rates of cancer and heart disease, compared to other types of commuters.

The study was well designed as it included more than 200,000 adults working full time away from their homes and aged between 40 and 69 years. Commuting on a bicycle was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular diseasecancer and death from any cause, while those walking to work only had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices              


Vitamin C supplementation for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

April 24, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: Vitamin C is an essential micronutrient and powerful antioxidant. Observational studies have shown an inverse relationship between vitamin C intake and major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Results from clinical trials are less consistent. This review aims to determine the effectiveness of vitamin C supplementation as a single supplement for the primary prevention of CVD.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Cochrane Library              


Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

February 14, 2017

Source: Circulation

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Date of publication: January 2017

Publication type: Scientific Statement

In a nutshell: Discusses the cardiometabolic health effects of eating patterns: skipping breakfast, intermittent fasting, meal frequency (number of daily eating occasions), and timing of eating and propose definitions for meals, snacks, and eating occasions for use in research.

Length of publication: 27 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    Circulation