Good neighbours give health benefits

October 8, 2014

Source:  The Independent

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers from the University of Michigan have found being part of a close community and living next to good neighbours can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.  The effects of having a positive relationship with neighbours and the community at large included the lowering of stress levels and increased social support.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Healthy Places

November 8, 2011

Source: National Heart Forum (NHF)

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Date of publication: 21 October 2011

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The NHF announced the launch of Healthy Places, a new interactive online resource developed with the backing of the Department of Health.  It covers legal issues, planning law and regulations to show local councils, planning groups and health practitioners how they can use existing legislation to improve public health. Features a wide range of highly practical case studies from throughout the UK, showing how the legal regulatory environment is used in areas such as travel, food, physical activity, to proactively support healthy communities.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:


Quality of life and cost-effectiveness of a 3-year trial of lifestyle intervention in primary health care

December 7, 2010

Source: Archives of Internal Medicine, 13 September 2010, vol 170 no 16, pp 1470-1479

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Date of publication: September 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This Swedish study of 151 patients over 3 years, demonstrated clear and cost-effective impact of group-based lifestyle interventions on quality of life (QOL) in patients at moderate to high risk of CVD. The researchers performed health economic evaluation, cost-utility analysis and cost-effectiveness using the net monetary benefit method.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Defining and setting national goals for cardiovascular health promotion and disease reduction

February 10, 2010

Source: Circulation, 2010, 121 (4) p. 586-613

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Date of publication: February 2010

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Recommendations of the Goals and Metrics Committee of the Strategic Planning Task Force of the American Heart Association (AHA). This committee has determined the metrics needed to monitor cardiovascular health over time, and recommends goals for further reductions in cardiovascular disease and stroke mortality. Its Impact Goals are: ‘By 2020, to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20% while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20%’. These goals will require new strategic directions from the AHA in its research, clinical, public health and advocacy programmes for cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention in the next decade and beyond.

Length of publication: 28 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: American Heart Association


Home based versus centre based cardiac rehabilitation

February 10, 2010

Source: BMJ, 2010, 340 (7740) p. 249

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Date of publication: January, 2010

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell: Twelve studies with a total of 1938 participants were included in this Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis. No difference was seen in terms of mortality and other factors but there was evidence of superior adherence in the home-based participants. No consistent difference was seen in the healthcare costs of the two forms of cardiac rehabilitation. Both were found to be equally effective in improving clinical and health-related quality of life outcomes. This finding supports the further provision of evidence-based, home-based cardiac rehabilitation. However, the choice of home-based or centre-based rehabilitation should reflect the preference of the individual patient.

Length of publication: 15 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Cardiac rehabilitation programme for coronary heart disease patients: an integrative literature review

August 16, 2009

Source: International Journal of Nursing Practice, 2009, 15 (3) p. 131-139

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Date of publication: June, 2009

Publication type: Review

In a nutshell: A literature review was carried out to determine the effectiveness of current cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes, and whether nurses are part of the multidisciplinary CR teams. The 13 programmes identified in the literature review showed significant improvements in the quality of life of participants, and a reduction in depression and anxiety. Some programmes identified nurses as CR providers, but did not clearly describe their role. The review concluded that nurses in developing countries should participate in cardiac rehabilitation programmes, especially home-based CR, to improve patients’ participation.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.