A randomised trial of a remote home support programme for infants with major congenital heart disease

October 12, 2012

Source: Heart, 2012, 98 (20) p. 1523-1528

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: October 2012

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A tele-medicine home support programme for families of infants with major congenital heart disease was assessed and evaluated in this study. Home support with video-conferencing was preferred to telephone consultations. Parents were highly satisfied with the programme. The research concluded that tele-homecare is sustainable, effective and may reduce costs.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Telehealth trial shows early success

January 13, 2012

Source: Department of Health

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Date of publication: December 2011

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The Whole System Demonstrator (WSD) programme was established in 2008 to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of telehealth, and focused on heart disease, COPD and diabetes. It was the largest randomised controlled trial of telehealth in the world, covering three sites in the UK and 238 GP practices. This news item contains a link to the headline findings of the WSD programme, which were published on 5th December 2011 and show that telehealth can help to plan care for people with long-term conditions.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Lessons from the US: using technology and homecare to improve chronic disease management

June 10, 2010

Source: Healthcare at Home

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Date of publication: May 2010

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report is based on the observations of NHS and Healthcare at Home staff during a US study tour. The authors observe how their American colleagues use remote technology to manage chronic diseases such as hypertension and heart failure, and explore which technologies and models could be adopted successfully in the UK.

Length of publication: 24 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Kings Fund