New hope to prevent dangerous blood clots found in the legs

August 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Common anti-allergy medicines could prove to be effective treatment for potentially fatal blood clots in the legs, according to new research we funded. The findings, published in the journal Circulation Research, may pave the way for new medicines to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) – a health issue that can be a particular problem on long-haul flights or other situations related to long-term immobilization.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


More older adults ‘may benefit from taking statins,’ study reports

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Nearly all men over 60 and women over 75 eligible for statins, analysis suggests,” The Guardian reports.

This is the finding of a study that aimed to see how many people in England would qualify for statin use if the 2014 NICE guidelines for statin therapy in adults were followed.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Research shows broken heart syndrome causes long lasting heart damage

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A condition once thought to temporarily cause heart failure in people who experience severe stress might actually cause longer-lasting damage to the heart muscle, according to new research that we’ve funded.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Using tick saliva to treat a deadly heart condition

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a dangerous type of heart disease which can cause sudden cardiac death in young adults, according to research we’ve funded published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Deadly heart conditions being attributed to stress and anxiety

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A survey published today by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) has found that six in ten patients living with inherited heart conditions face long delays before receiving a diagnosis as their symptoms are attributed to other conditions like stress, anxiety and epilepsy.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Iron deficiency in heart failure patients contributes to poor outcomes

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Patients admitted with acute heart failure who exhibit iron deficiency (ID) tend to have a longer and more expensive hospital stay and a greater likelihood of readmission, according to analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) conference in Manchester.   The research, which looked at data over three consecutive years, showed that 14 per cent of patients with heart failure also had ID as a secondary diagnosis, and that hospital spells for these patients were significantly more costly than those without ID.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation