Scientists to create computer models to study deadly heart condition

September 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists at the University of Oxford are to develop computer models of the human heart to better understand a deadly inherited heart condition.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the main cause of sudden cardiac death in children and young adults. About 1 in 500 of the UK population has the condition, although most people who have it have few, if any, symptoms.

HCM affects both the muscle structure and electrical function of the heart, but how those factors combine to increase the risk of abnormal heart rhythms and sudden death is not known.

To better understand that relationship, Dr Alfonso Bueno-Orovio has been awarded £542,000 by us to take up a prestigious Intermediate Fellowship. He will collaborate with experts working in computer science, laboratories and clinics to construct computer models of the human heart in HCM. These can then be used to run simulations of how the disease causes dangerous heart rhythms.

This research could reveal more about the mechanisms behind HCM, and highlight new ways to diagnose and treat people who are at most risk of sudden cardiac death.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

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‘Exercise pill’ could potentially help people with heart failure

September 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: One of the causes of heart failure is cardiomyopathy, which is when the heart muscle has become stretched, thickened or stiff.

Researchers wanted to see if a protein called cardiotrophin 1 could help stimulate the growth of new muscle cells.

The study found the protein promoted heart cell growth, similar to the way exercise increases heart strength. The effect of the protein was also reversible, as are the effects of exercise.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


New hope to prevent dangerous blood clots found in the legs

August 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Common anti-allergy medicines could prove to be effective treatment for potentially fatal blood clots in the legs, according to new research we funded. The findings, published in the journal Circulation Research, may pave the way for new medicines to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) – a health issue that can be a particular problem on long-haul flights or other situations related to long-term immobilization.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


More older adults ‘may benefit from taking statins,’ study reports

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Nearly all men over 60 and women over 75 eligible for statins, analysis suggests,” The Guardian reports.

This is the finding of a study that aimed to see how many people in England would qualify for statin use if the 2014 NICE guidelines for statin therapy in adults were followed.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Research shows broken heart syndrome causes long lasting heart damage

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A condition once thought to temporarily cause heart failure in people who experience severe stress might actually cause longer-lasting damage to the heart muscle, according to new research that we’ve funded.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Using tick saliva to treat a deadly heart condition

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a dangerous type of heart disease which can cause sudden cardiac death in young adults, according to research we’ve funded published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation