Iron deficiency in heart failure patients contributes to poor outcomes

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Patients admitted with acute heart failure who exhibit iron deficiency (ID) tend to have a longer and more expensive hospital stay and a greater likelihood of readmission, according to analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) conference in Manchester.   The research, which looked at data over three consecutive years, showed that 14 per cent of patients with heart failure also had ID as a secondary diagnosis, and that hospital spells for these patients were significantly more costly than those without ID.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


New imaging technique leads to promising results for experimental heart attack drug

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Every day 190 people in the UK die from a heart attack. Researchers in Oxford have used a scanning method to develop a new drug which may help hearts heal.

The scientists unveiled their promising work on a new drug to help patients who have suffered a heart attack. Presenting at the British Cardiovascular Society’s annual conference, the BHF-funded team from the University of Oxford described how an experimental drug called 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) may improve heart function after a heart attack.

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


Promising new therapy may help heart attack patients’ hearts heal

June 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A naturally occurring molecule called interleukin-4 may help patients recover from a heart attack, according to research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference today.  The findings show that heart attack patients with low blood levels of a particular white blood cell, called an eosinophil, have higher death rates in the six months after their heart attack. Researchers have also discovered that treating these patients with a molecule called interleukin-4 (IL-4) may help to reduce these death rates.

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation      


Breakthrough blood test to improve diagnosis of heart attacks

April 24, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Researchers have developed a new blood test to diagnose heart attacks, thanks to BHF-funding. The study found that the new test is more sensitive and quicker in detecting heart damage than the current troponin test.

Using donated human heart muscle tissue, the team found that a protein called cardiac myosin-binding protein C was even more sensitive and better at detecting damage to the heart caused by a heart attack than the widely used troponin test.

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Acknowledgement:  British Heart Foundation              


Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

April 24, 2017

Source: Cochrane Library

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: Background – Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet ASCVD risk factor control and secondary prevention rates remain low. A fixed-dose combination of blood pressure- and cholesterol-lowering and antiplatelet treatments into a single pill, or polypill, has been proposed as one strategy to reduce the global burden of ASCVD.

Objectives – To determine the effect of fixed-dose combination therapy on all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal ASCVD events, and adverse events. We also sought to determine the effect of fixed-dose combination therapy on blood pressure, lipids, adherence, discontinuation rates, health-related quality of life, and costs.

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Acknowledgement: Cochrane Library              


New hope for deep vein thrombosis patients

March 17, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Researchers have found a new target for drugs to prevent dangerous blood clots in the legs, thanks to our funding. The research found that mice with a defective receptor called CLEC-2 were protected from deep vein thrombosis.

The current treatments for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which affects around 60,000 people in the UK every year, include anti-clotting drugs such as heparin and warfarin. These drugs are relatively effective but put patients at increased risk of dangerous bleeding. This is because as well as targeting the blood clot, they also affect haemostasis, the body’s natural response to blood vessel injury and bleeding. Imbalanced haemostasis can be dangerous, so patients have to be monitored carefully and hospitalised following bleeding injury.

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Study reveals important new target for high blood pressure treatment

March 17, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New more effective treatments for high blood pressure could be possible thanks to the discovery that the nitric oxide that regulates blood pressure is formed in nerves rather than in the walls of blood vessels.

The surprising findings, published in the journal Hypertension, from BHF-funded researchers at King’s College London, follows a world-first study in healthy humans, and builds on previous work that established the fundamental role that the gas nitric oxide plays in regulating blood pressure.

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation