Does more leg fat protect women against heart attack and stroke?

August 16, 2019

Source: NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Researchers looked at the body composition of 2,683 women in the US who were a healthy weight and had been through the menopause.

They found women who had a higher percentage of fat around their trunk were more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than women who had more fat on their legs, but less around their upper body.

Because of the nature of the study, we cannot be sure that body fat distribution directly caused the differences in risk of having a heart attack and stroke.

But previous studies have found people who are “apple-shaped” with more central body fat have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than those who are “pear-shaped”.

Scientists think this may be because fat on the legs is a harmless way of storing energy, while fat around the abdominal organs may affect metabolism and put people at risk of diabetes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Marijuana may be risky for those with heart disease

February 28, 2019

Source: Medical News Today

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: Case Study

In a nutshell: Although marijuana may have some benefits, its use could cause health issues for older people with cardiovascular disease. One case, in particular, is sparking some questions.   A Canadian Journal of Cardiology case report examined a 70-year-old man who had a heart attack after eating a lollipop that was infused with 90 milligrams (mg) of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — which is largely responsible for marijuana’s psychological effects.

The man lived with stable coronary artery disease, and he was taking cardiac medication. He ate most of the lollipop and did so to help minimize pain and improve sleep.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   Medical News Today


High blood pressure smoking and diabetes increase heart attack risk more in women than in men

December 21, 2018

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Date of publication: November 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: A study published in the BMJ reveals some risk factors have a greater impact on heart attack risk in women than they do in men.

Overall, men are at greater risk of heart attack than women, but several studies have suggested that certain risk factors have more of an impact on the risk in women than in men. To look more closely at this association, researchers at Oxford University looked at data on almost half a million people enrolled in the UK Biobank – a database of biological information from British adults. The 471,998 people had no history of cardiovascular disease, were aged 40 to 69 years and 56% of them were women.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation


Y chromosome puts men at risk of heart disease

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: New research funded by us suggests that heart disease risk can be passed from father to son. The research, presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich shows that men who carry a specific type of Y chromosome are at an 11 per cent increased risk of heart and circulatory disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


One in 10 men aged 50 ‘have the heart of a 60-year-old’

November 7, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: September 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “One-tenth of 50-year-old men have a heart age 10 years older than they are,” BBC News reports. This is the finding of an analysis of 1.2 million people who used the NHS Heart Age Test.

The principle behind the test is that you can “age” your heart through unhealthy behaviour such as smoking and being obese.

Underlying conditions like high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which often have no noticeable symptoms, can also age the heart.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


High BMI and blood pressure create a heavy heart

November 7, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Being overweight or obese creates damaging changes to the structure of the heart, according to new research we’ve part-funded published in the scientific journal PLoS ONE today. The new research uses UK Biobank data to reveal – for the first time – the direct damage that carrying extra weight has on the heart’s weight and size, and implicates a range of other modifiable risk factors including high blood pressure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Long working week ‘may increase risk of irregular heartbeat’

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Long working days can cause heart problems, study says,” The Guardian reports.

Researchers found people who work 55 or more hours a week had an increased risk of developing a type of irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, where the heart can beat very fast.

Complications of atrial fibrillation include stroke and heart failure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines