Long working week ‘may increase risk of irregular heartbeat’

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Long working days can cause heart problems, study says,” The Guardian reports.

Researchers found people who work 55 or more hours a week had an increased risk of developing a type of irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, where the heart can beat very fast.

Complications of atrial fibrillation include stroke and heart failure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Some types of vegetarian diet can raise heart disease risk

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A US study found a vegetarian diet based on less healthy food options, such as refined grains, could increase the risk of heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Three quarters of UK adults unaware of impact of air pollution on the heart

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Eight in ten deaths related to air pollution are caused by a heart attack or stroke, however data released today has revealed that three in four adults are unaware of the extent of the impact that air pollution can have on the heart.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Every breath we take: the lifelong impact of air pollution

December 9, 2016

Source: Royal College of Physicians

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Date of publication: 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: The report starkly sets out the dangerous impact air pollution is currently having on our nation’s health. Each year in the UK, around 40,000 deaths are attributable to exposure to outdoor air pollution which plays a role in many of the major health challenges of our day. It has been linked to cancer, asthma, stroke and heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and changes linked to dementia. The health problems resulting from exposure to air pollution have a high cost to people who suffer from illness and premature death, to our health services and to business. In the UK, these costs add up to more than £20 billion every year.

Length of publication: 123 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Royal College of Physicians


How to manage and reduce stress

December 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Research has shown that stress can sometimes be positive. It makes us more alert and helps us perform better in certain situations. However, stress has only been found as beneficial if it is short-lived. Excessive or prolonged stress can contribute to illness such as heart disease and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Worrying about health linked to heart disease

November 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Worried well ‘make themselves sick’,” reports The Daily Telegraph.

Several other news outlets covered the same story with headlines about how the “worried well” may be more likely to develop heart disease.

The stories are based on a Norwegian population study with 7,052 participants that aimed to see whether health anxiety (hypochondria) was linked with the development of heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


Bad childhood experiences ‘mean chronic illness more likely’

November 15, 2016

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Children who are exposed to abuse, domestic violence or other stresses are far more likely to develop long term health problems, says new research.

The Public Health Wales study looks at adverse experiences in childhood (ACEs) which include parents separating.

Children with four or more ACEs, around 14%, are three times more likely to get lung or heart disease later in life.

One senior health figure said instead of “mending broken adults” a focus was needed on “building stronger children”.

Length of publication: 1 website

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News