Genetic tool to predict adult heart attack risk in childhood

October 19, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: People at high risk of a heart attack in adulthood could be spotted much earlier in life with a one-off DNA test, according to new research. An international team led by researchers from the University of Leicester, University of Cambridge and the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia used UK Biobank data to develop and test a powerful scoring system, called a Genomic Risk Score (GRS) which can identify people who are at risk of developing coronary heart disease prematurely because of their genetics.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   British Heart Foundation

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Growing diabetes epidemic could trigger ‘sharp rise’ in heart attacks and strokes by 2035

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: According to our new analysis the number of people suffering heart attacks and strokes as a result of their diabetes could rise by 29% by 2035. The forecast reveals that the growing number of people with diabetes could result in nearly 39,000 people living with diabetes suffering a heart attack in 2035 – a rise of 9,000 compared to 2015 – and over 50,000 people suffering a stroke – a rise of 11,000.

Today in England, nearly 4 million people are living with diabetes. But this is expected to rise to over 5 million over the next 20 years, partly due to people’s worsening lifestyles and the UK’s growing obesity rates.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

 


Public Health England launch free online Heart Age Test that gives early warning of heart attack and stroke risk

September 21, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: September 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: We are supporting Public Health England in their call for adults across the country to take a free, online Heart Age Test, which will provide an immediate estimation of their ‘heart age’. If someone’s heart age is higher than their actual age, they are at an increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Scan could help prevent deadly heart failure in cancer patients

November 7, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: October 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: High-tech scanning techniques could reveal whether chemotherapy is damaging a person’s heart before any symptoms appear, according to research we’ve funded presented at the Global Cardio-oncology Summit in London.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


Development and validation of QRISK3 risk prediction algorithms to estimate future risk of cardiovascular disease: prospective cohort study

June 8, 2017

Source: BMJ

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Study

In a nutshell: Results 363 565 incident cases of cardiovascular disease were identified in the derivation cohort during follow-up arising from 50.8 million person years of observation. All new risk factors considered met the model inclusion criteria except for HIV/AIDS, which was not statistically significant. The models had good calibration and high levels of explained variation and discrimination. In women, the algorithm explained 59.6% of the variation in time to diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (R2, with higher values indicating more variation), and the D statistic was 2.48 and Harrell’s C statistic was 0.88 (both measures of discrimination, with higher values indicating better discrimination). The corresponding values for men were 54.8%, 2.26, and 0.86. Overall performance of the updated QRISK3 algorithms was similar to the QRISK2 algorithms.  Conclusion Updated QRISK3 risk prediction models were developed and validated. The inclusion of additional clinical variables in QRISK3 (chronic kidney disease, a measure of systolic blood pressure variability (standard deviation of repeated measures), migraine, corticosteroids, SLE, atypical antipsychotics, severe mental illness, and erectile dysfunction) can help enable doctors to identify those at most risk of heart disease and stroke.

Length of publication: 16 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BMJ              


Atrial fibrillation linked to wider range of serious conditions

September 12, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation news

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Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation is associated with a wide range of serious events, including heart attacks, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sudden cardiac death, according to new research.

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common abnormal heart rhythms and a major cause of stroke. However, the study, from the University of Oxford and MIT in the USA published in The BMJ, suggests that the risk associated with many of these other conditions and events is greater than that of stroke.

As a result of their findings, the researchers are calling for new treatments and approaches to reduce the risk of non-stroke events in people with AF.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    British Heart Foundation news