Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News

Advertisements

Development and validation of QRISK3 risk prediction algorithms to estimate future risk of cardiovascular disease: prospective cohort study

June 8, 2017

Source: BMJ

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Study

In a nutshell: Results 363 565 incident cases of cardiovascular disease were identified in the derivation cohort during follow-up arising from 50.8 million person years of observation. All new risk factors considered met the model inclusion criteria except for HIV/AIDS, which was not statistically significant. The models had good calibration and high levels of explained variation and discrimination. In women, the algorithm explained 59.6% of the variation in time to diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (R2, with higher values indicating more variation), and the D statistic was 2.48 and Harrell’s C statistic was 0.88 (both measures of discrimination, with higher values indicating better discrimination). The corresponding values for men were 54.8%, 2.26, and 0.86. Overall performance of the updated QRISK3 algorithms was similar to the QRISK2 algorithms.  Conclusion Updated QRISK3 risk prediction models were developed and validated. The inclusion of additional clinical variables in QRISK3 (chronic kidney disease, a measure of systolic blood pressure variability (standard deviation of repeated measures), migraine, corticosteroids, SLE, atypical antipsychotics, severe mental illness, and erectile dysfunction) can help enable doctors to identify those at most risk of heart disease and stroke.

Length of publication: 16 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BMJ              


Atrial fibrillation linked to wider range of serious conditions

September 12, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation news

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation is associated with a wide range of serious events, including heart attacks, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sudden cardiac death, according to new research.

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common abnormal heart rhythms and a major cause of stroke. However, the study, from the University of Oxford and MIT in the USA published in The BMJ, suggests that the risk associated with many of these other conditions and events is greater than that of stroke.

As a result of their findings, the researchers are calling for new treatments and approaches to reduce the risk of non-stroke events in people with AF.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    British Heart Foundation news


Cardiac ‘bruising’ may predict worse heart attack

June 13, 2016

Source: BBC Health News

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: June 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: UK researchers say they have found a new way to tell if a heart attack is more severe and might cause lasting harm – by looking for bruising or bleeding in the heart muscle.  Patients with this sign on scans more often develop serious problems like heart failure, says the Glascow team.

It’s hoped the discovery could help with preventing such complications.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


Smoking could cause disease in more than 1.3 million over the next 20 years

May 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:  This study examined the effect of future trends in smoking prevalence on incidence of non-communicable disease such as cancer, coronary heart disease, COPD and stroke. It updates and builds on previous studies to review the latest trends in smoking prevalence to predict prevalence in twenty years.

Length of publication: 21 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Every breath we take: the lifelong impact of air pollution

May 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: The report starkly sets out the dangerous impact air pollution is currently having on our nation’s health.  Each year in the UK, around 40,000 deaths are attributable to exposure to outdoor air pollution which plays a role in many of the major health challenges of our day.  It has been linked to cancer, asthma, stroke and heart disease, diabetes, obesity and changes linked to dementia.  The health problems resulting from exposure to air pollution have a high cost to people who suffer from illness and premature death, to our health services and to business.  In the UK, these costs add up to more than £20 billion every year.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Fitness predicts long-term survival after a cardiovascular event

January 5, 2016

Source: BMJ Open

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  The objective of this study was to identify the role of fitness, fitness change, body mass index and other factors in predicting long-term (>5 years) survival in patients with coronary heart disease. Prior fitness and fitness improvement are strong predictors of long-term survival in patients who have experienced a cardiac event or procedure. Some secondary prevention medications make a significant contribution to reducing all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. This study supports public health messages promoting fitness for life.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  BMJ Open