People with severe eczema at higher risk of heart conditions

July 20, 2018

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A large UK study found that people with severe eczema were more likely than people without eczema to develop a range of heart conditions, including unstable angina, heart attack and heart failure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices

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Major heart attacks are more deadly during colder months

July 20, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Heart attacks are more likely to kill you in the winter than in the summer, according to new research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester. Cardiologists at Leeds General Infirmary compared information from 4,056 people who received treatment for a heart attack in four separate years, and found the most severe heart attacks were more deadly in the coldest six months, compared to the warmest.

The overall number of heart attacks was roughly the same in the coldest half of the year, compared to the warmer months (52% between November and April), with the most serious heart attacks leading to cardiac arrest and cardiogenic shock. The risk of dying within 30 days of a severe heart attack was nearly 50% higher in the six coldest months, compared to the six warmest months (28% vs 20%).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Increased risk of heart disease for mothers with more than 4 children

June 15, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2018

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Researchers from the Universities of Cambridge and North Carolina studied data from over 8,000 White and African-American women from the United States, aged 45-64 years. They found that having 5 or more children is associated with a 40% increased risk of a serious heart attack in the next 30 years, compared to having just 1 or 2 children, after taking into account how long the women breastfed for.

Having 5 or more children was also associated with a 30% increased risk of heart disease – the major cause of heart attacks – as well as a 25% increased risk of stroke and a 17% increase in the risk of heart failure compared to having 1-2 children. Having 3-4 children was also associated with a modest increased risk of serious health implications, but the research found that the most significant risk increases were seen with 5 or more children.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Weak handshake could be sign of a failing heart

June 15, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that a weak grip can be associated with changes in the heart’s structure and function, and could be used as a broad measure of someone’s heart health.

By asking people to grip a device called a dynamometer for 3 seconds, the scientists were able to determine someone’s grip strength and compare this to detailed scans of their heart.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Even moderate drinking linked to heart and circulatory diseases

April 27, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: April 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Regularly drinking more than the recommended UK guidelines for alcohol could take years off your life, according to new research that we part-funded published today in the Lancet. The study shows that drinking more alcohol is associated with a higher risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and death.

The authors say their findings challenge the widely held belief that moderate drinking is beneficial to cardiovascular health and support the UK’s recently lowered guidelines.

The study compared the health and drinking habits of around 600,000 current drinkers in 19 countries worldwide and controlled for age, smoking, history of diabetes, level of education and occupation.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


‘Apple-shaped’ women may have increased heart attack risk

April 27, 2018

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Women with apple-shaped bodies are ‘more likely to suffer heart attacks than those who are pear-shaped’,” the Daily Mirror reports, as a new study found a link between increased waist size and heart attack.

Researchers from the University of Oxford and other institutions investigated the links between having increased levels of body fat and the risk of having a heart attack.

They used data from people enrolled in the UK Biobank study, which asked nearly 500,000 adults between the ages of 40 and 69 about their health.

The study found having a bigger waist and having a bigger waist relative to your hips were linked to an increased risk of having a heart attack.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines


Weak handshake could be sign of a failing heart

April 27, 2018

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that a weak grip can be associated with changes in the heart’s structure and function, and could be used as a broad measure of someone’s heart health.

By asking people to grip a device called a dynamometer for 3 seconds, the scientists were able to determine someone’s grip strength and compare this to detailed scans of their heart.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation