High blood pressure and cholesterol in young adults linked to heart disease in later life

August 16, 2019

Source: NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Researchers in the US modelled the risk factors of 36,030 people who took part in 6 long-running studies. They estimated the effects of high cholesterol and high blood pressure in young adulthood (from the age of 18 to 39) on people’s risk of heart attack, stroke or heart failure in later adulthood.

They found that both raised LDL “bad” cholesterol and raised blood pressure in young adulthood were linked to an increased risk of heart disease in later life.

The researchers say their study adds to evidence that raised blood pressure and cholesterol in early adulthood can be particularly harmful, and that new ways of tackling cardiovascular risk in early adulthood are needed.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   NHS News – Behind the Headlines

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Increased risk of heart disease for healthy 75-year-olds who stop taking statins

August 16, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Statins are known to reduce the risk of further problems in patients of any age who have already suffered heart problems or stroke. However, until now it has not been clear how effective their use is in preventing such events occurring in healthy people aged 75 and over, with no previous history of cardiovascular disease.

Now, a nationwide study of 120,173 people in France, who were aged 75 between 2012 and 2014 and had been taking statins continuously for two years, has found those who stopped taking their statins had a 33% increased risk of being admitted to hospital with heart or blood vessel problems during an average follow-up period of 2.4 years.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Eggs linked to heart disease and death, study suggests

May 14, 2019

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: High levels of dietary cholesterol, like those found in eggs, are linked to an increased risk of heart and circulatory disease, or even death, according to a new study published in JAMA.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


E-cigarettes linked to heart attacks, coronary artery disease and depression

May 14, 2019

Source: Science Daily

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Date of publication: March 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that adults who report puffing e-cigarettes, or vaping, are significantly more likely to have a heart attack, coronary artery disease and depression compared with those who don’t use them or any tobacco products.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   Science Daily


‘Know your cholesterol like you know your Pin code’

February 28, 2019

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: February 2019

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: People are being encouraged to know their cholesterol and blood pressure numbers as well as they know their bank Pin code – because it could save their life.

These numbers flag up early signs of cardiovascular disease, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Forty health organisations have teamed up to urge more people to go for a routine NHS health check.

Doctors should also identify and treat at-risk patients better, they say.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes one in four deaths in England, the equivalent of someone dying every four minutes, according to Public Health England and NHS England.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:   BBC Health News

 

 

 


Processed meats and ready meals ‘still too high in salt’

December 21, 2018

Source: BBC Health news

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Date of publication: December 2018

Publication type: News

In a nutshell: There is still too much salt in processed meats such as sausages and bacon and ready meals, a Public Health England report suggests.

The groups of foods were among those that met none of the average salt targets set by PHE in 2014.

But some other foods, including breakfast cereals, baked beans and pizzas, did meet the voluntary targets.

The meat industry insisted it was “playing its part” in reducing salt in its products.

Too much salt can raise your blood pressure, which puts you at increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health news

 


Chocolate consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis of prospective studies

October 19, 2018

Source: Heart Journal

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Date of publication: October 2018

Publication type: Article (abstract)

In a nutshell: Studies investigating the impact of chocolate consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) have reached inconsistent conclusions. As such, a quantitative assessment of the dose–response association between chocolate consumption and incident CVD has not been reported. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the risk of CVD with chocolate consumption. Chocolate consumption may be associated with reduced risk of CVD at <100 g/week consumption. Higher levels may negate the health benefits and induce adverse effects associated with high sugar consumption.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Heart Journal