People who are ‘healthy’ obese are at risk of heart disease

May 18, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New research shows that so called ‘metabolically healthy’ obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure or stroke, than normal weight people.

The study, presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO), examined whether the risk of developing cardiovascular conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure, was different for normal weight people with no metabolic conditions or people with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation                


Low-gluten diet linked to heart attack risk

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Gluten-free diet can do more harm than good for people without coeliac disease,” The Independent reports, as a new study found that the “trendy gluten-free diets loved by Gwyneth Paltrow and Russell Crowe may increase the risk of heart disease”.  The current study followed more than 100,000 people from 1986 to 2012, assessing their diets and whether they had heart attacks during that time. These people did not have heart disease at the start of the study, and importantly did not have coeliac disease.

Overall, it found that once other risk factors were taken into account, people’s consumption of gluten was not related to their risk of heart attack. However, further analyses suggested that lower consumption of gluten specifically from whole grains (wheat, barley and rye) was associated with increased heart attack risk compared to higher consumption from these sources.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices            


Ibuprofen linked to increased risk of heart attacks

May 18, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Researchers looked at data from 446,763 people and found some evidence that all commonly-used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) appear to increase the risk of heart attack, and that the risk rises in the first week of use. The study found the risk was highest with higher doses.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices                


Long-term daily drinking linked to stiffening of the arteries in men

March 17, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A UK study found men who consistently drank more than the recommended limits had signs of stiffening of the arteries, which has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease.

Researchers used data from more than 3,000 British civil servants to examine the link. Participants reported their alcohol intake over a 20-year period.

Stiffness of the arteries was also measured using a device that looks at how pressure waves move through an artery – the faster the pulse wave moves, the stiffer the arteries.

Men who were frequent heavy drinkers across the follow-up period had stiffer arteries compared with frequent moderate drinkers. There were no significant findings seen for women. The reasons for this are unclear.

While the study cannot prove cause and effect, and stiffening of the arteries can have a range of causes, it does highlight the fact alcohol-related harms can affect anyone.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices


Worrying about work out-of-hours ‘may be bad for the heart’

March 17, 2017

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A small study of London-based office workers found those who reported being frequently troubled by work-related issues had patterns of heart activity associated with stress and anxiety.

Researchers interviewed 195 adults aged between 20 and 62 (70% male) about what they termed work-related rumination.

This was defined as how often a person was troubled by work-related issues when they weren’t at work, measured on a scale of one (never/seldom) to five (very often/always).

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices


Handful of nuts ‘cuts heart disease and cancer’ risk

January 10, 2017

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication:  December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Researchers found consistent evidence that a 28 gram daily serving of nuts – which is literally a handful (for most nuts) – was linked with around 20% reduced risk of heart disease, cancer and death from any cause.  However, as is so often the case with studies into diet and health, the researchers cannot prove nuts are the sole cause of these outcomes.

Length of publication:  1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines