Study recommends screening toddlers for heart disease risk

November 15, 2016

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: “Toddlers should be screened for an inherited form of heart disease … experts suggest,” BBC News reports.

A new study looked at the feasibility of screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), an inherited condition that affects around 1 to 2 in every 250 people in the UK. It can cause abnormally high cholesterol levels.

It doesn’t usually cause any noticeable symptoms, but people with FH aged between 20 and 40 are 100 times more likely to have a heart attack than other people their age.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Atrial fibrillation linked to wider range of serious conditions

September 12, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation news

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Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation is associated with a wide range of serious events, including heart attacks, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sudden cardiac death, according to new research.

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common abnormal heart rhythms and a major cause of stroke. However, the study, from the University of Oxford and MIT in the USA published in The BMJ, suggests that the risk associated with many of these other conditions and events is greater than that of stroke.

As a result of their findings, the researchers are calling for new treatments and approaches to reduce the risk of non-stroke events in people with AF.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    British Heart Foundation news


Damaged heart genes can be inherited

August 12, 2016

Source: BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New analysis of congenital heart disease has found affected children often inherit damaging gene variants from their seemingly healthy parents.

The work by Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and partially funded by the British Heart Foundation, sought to discover more about the genetic background of CHD.

CHD affects 1% of people worldwide and around 1.35 million babies each year. It causes problems such as holes in the heart which can need corrective surgery.

The international research, published in Nature Genetics, analysed the protein-coding segments of the genome of 1,900 CHD patients and their parents.

It had previously been thought that many cases might be caused by new genetic mutations which were absent in the parents.

This study found children can instead inherit rare gene variants and it paves the way for affected families to be given clearer advice.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health


The mystery disease causing heart attacks in women

March 14, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare yet devastating condition predominantly affecting young, healthy women. SCAD means the layers which form the coronary vessels of the heart tear away from each other. As a result, blood can collect between the vessel layers forming a blood blister which restricts or blocks blood flow to the heart. This leads to a SCAD heart attack.

A ‘normal’ heart attack is caused by build-up of fatty deposits on the vessel walls, which is entirely different to one caused by SCAD. With little known about this disease, research is key to unlocking its secrets.

Thanks to a group of determined SCAD survivors, the first ever UK clinical study, led by BHF-funded researcher Dr David Adlam at Glenfield Hospital and the University of Leicester, launched in 2014. The group, led by SCAD survivor Becks Breslin, found each other through social media and contacted Dr Adlam to help find answers. Together, Dr Adlam and Becks created the SCAD UK and Europe research portal, giving SCAD survivors from near and far an opportunity to share their stories and register as a participant in this pioneering trial. 

 

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Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Minister defends controversial NHS Health Checks programme

July 14, 2014

Source: The BMJ

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Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The NHS Health Checks Programme was designed to cut cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. People aged 40 – 74 are invited to attend a check-up once every five years to assess their risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and diabetes. However, the programme has been criticised for being ineffective and a waste of money. Jane Ellison, the public health minister for England, defended the programme when she appeared before MPs on the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee.

Length of publication: 1 page

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NHS Health Check up by 9.5% in 2013 to 2014

July 7, 2014

Source: PHE Bulletin

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Date of publication: June 2014

Publication type: Newsletter

In a nutshell:  More people than ever before are accepting the offer to attend an NHS Health Check, according to figures from PHE. Last year in England over 1.3 million people took up the offer, which aims to identify those at risk of serious but potentially avoidable conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

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Acknowledgement: PHE Bulletin


Did you know that the NHS Health Check programme is included in the Public Health Responsibility Deal?

February 11, 2013

Source: NHS Health Check

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Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Public Health Commissioners may want to work alongside local employers to encourage and enable staff to take up their NHS Health Check and other screening opportunites from the NHS, as part of the ‘Public Health Responsibility Deal’, which is part of the Department of Health’s ‘Health at Work Network’.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.