Using tick saliva to treat a deadly heart condition

July 10, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a dangerous type of heart disease which can cause sudden cardiac death in young adults, according to research we’ve funded published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

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NHS Stockport launches Europe’s first service to reduce avoidable hospital admissions

October 6, 2009

Source: NHS Stockport

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Date of publication: September, 2009

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: NHS Stockport is launching a new service which bridges the gap between emergency services and self-care at home. The Stockport Early Intervention Service (EIS) treats patients with chronic longterm illnesses and ambulatory conditions such as congestive cardiac failure, who are often treated in A&E although their conditions can often be treated in the community. Patients will be referred to the EIS by their GP or community nurse for services ranging from medical advice or diagnosis to investigation and treatment.

Length of publication: 2 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


UK gets first drug-eluting balloon dilation catheter

February 10, 2009

Source: British Cardiovascular Society

For full text link, click here

Year of Publication: 2009

Publication Type: News item

In a nutshell: The Dior drug-eluting balloon was launched at the Advanced Cardiovascular Intervention Meeting in London at the end of January. This ‘second generation’ drug-eluting balloon is coated with paclitaxel, which prevents restenosis of coronary stents. It can be used to treat both high-risk and low-risk percutaneous coronary intervention patients. It provides an alternative option to treat patients for whom stent implantation is not desirable.

Length of Publication: 1 page

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Acknowledgements:  British Cardiovascular Society