Study suggests more people should be given blood pressure-lowering medication

January 5, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  A study published today in the Lancet suggests that blood pressure-lowering drugs should be offered to all individuals at high risk of having a heart attack or stroke regardless of their blood pressure at the start of treatment. Currently, doctors only offer blood pressure lowering drugs to people considered to have ‘high’ blood pressure. However, the research suggests that even lowering the blood pressure – within reason – of someone with ‘normal’ blood pressure could lower their risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  British Heart Foundation

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Sugary drinks linked to increased heart failure risk in men

January 5, 2016

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  A Swedish study found that men who consumed two or more sugary drinks a day had, on average, a 23% increase in the risk of heart failure.

The study included more than 42,000 Swedish men aged 45 to 79 and data on their estimated daily or weekly intake of sweetened drinks from a food frequency questionnaire completed in 1997.

After a follow-up period of nearly 12 years, men who reported consuming two or more glasses (two 200ml portions) of sweetened beverages a day were 23% more likely to experience heart failure compared to individuals who did not consume any sweetened drinks.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices


Normal BMI with a big belly ‘deadlier than obesity’

January 5, 2016

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A major new study tracked more than 15,000 adults to look at the effect of body size on mortality. Researchers found that people with a normal BMI but a large WHR had increased risk of dying during follow-up compared to people with a smaller WHR. This included people of similar BMI, and also people who were overweight or obese, but with a smaller WHR. One hypothesis is that having a big belly increases the amount of fat inside the abdomen (visceral fat). This may then cause inflammation to the vital organs stored inside the abdomen, which possibly makes people vulnerable to chronic diseases.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices


Fitness predicts long-term survival after a cardiovascular event

January 5, 2016

Source: BMJ Open

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Date of publication: 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  The objective of this study was to identify the role of fitness, fitness change, body mass index and other factors in predicting long-term (>5 years) survival in patients with coronary heart disease. Prior fitness and fitness improvement are strong predictors of long-term survival in patients who have experienced a cardiac event or procedure. Some secondary prevention medications make a significant contribution to reducing all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. This study supports public health messages promoting fitness for life.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  BMJ Open


Can fidgeting improve your health?

January 5, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: We analyze news coverage of research suggesting that fidgeting can erase the damaging effects of spending a lot of time sitting down.   “Fidgeting can help you live longer” and “Restlessness at work can save your life” were the optimistic headlines in some newspapers. They were responding to a study that looked at the effects of fidgeting on the damaging effects of spending a lot of time sitting down.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Do five coffees a day keep the doctor away?

January 5, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  According to new research, drinking coffee is associated with lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s. Drinking coffee, researchers claim, may even lower the risk of suicide.  The study, published in the science journal Circulation, was led by researchers from Harvard School of Public Health and others.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Further dissemination

January 5, 2016

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