PHE launches new tool to raise awareness about heart disease

March 6, 2015

Source: Public Health England

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  Using the new tool, people can find out the age of their heart by inputting simple lifestyle information, such as their weight and whether they smoke, and see how this compares to their actual age. They can then take action to improve their health.

The personalised results, combined with the free NHS Health Check, give an opportunity for people to take action to reduce their risk of developing serious but preventable conditions such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, and certain types of dementia.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  Public Health England newsletter

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Training very hard ‘as bad as no exercise at all’

February 10, 2015

Source: BBC News health

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A Danish study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests that jogging at a steady pace for less than 150 minutes a week was best for health. Joggers and non-joggers had been prospectively followed up since 2001. The findings of the study suggested that light and moderate joggers had lower mortality than the sedentary group but that strenuous joggers had a mortality rate not statistically different from that of the sedentary non-joggers.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Journal of the American College of Cardiology


Smartphone-based home care model improved use of cardiac rehabilitation in postmyocardial infarction

July 11, 2014

Source: Heart online first

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Date of publication: June 2014

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Uptake of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can be poor, especially among women, older patients and ethnic minorities. This study looked at a home-based CR programme called the Care Assessment Programme, which used smartphones to monitor health and exercise, and to deliver motivational and educational material. This home service had higher rates of uptake, adherence and completion than a traditional centre-based programme among post-myocardial infarction patients.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


People with kidney disease can lower their risk of a cardiovascular event by lowering their blood pressure

December 10, 2013

Source: The George Institute for Global Health

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Date of publication: October 2013

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell:  Research has found that lowering blood pressure in people with kidney disease can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease. With kidney disease comes an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It is believed that advising people to lower their blood pressure could save many people from heart attacks and strokes.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


Prescribing exercise in primary care: ten practical steps

August 15, 2011

Source: BMJ

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Date of publication: July 2011

Publication type: Editorial

In a nutshell: Pratical advice for exercise prescription to encourage patients to adopt a healthy lifestyle and help them maintain it. One tip recommends the use of e-mail and text reminders, website support and smartphone apps.

Length of publication: 2 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Quality of life and cost-effectiveness of a 3-year trial of lifestyle intervention in primary health care

December 7, 2010

Source: Archives of Internal Medicine, 13 September 2010, vol 170 no 16, pp 1470-1479

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Date of publication: September 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This Swedish study of 151 patients over 3 years, demonstrated clear and cost-effective impact of group-based lifestyle interventions on quality of life (QOL) in patients at moderate to high risk of CVD. The researchers performed health economic evaluation, cost-utility analysis and cost-effectiveness using the net monetary benefit method.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


A low intensity, community based lifestyle programme to prevent weight gain in women with young children

July 21, 2010

Source: BMJ, 2010, 341 (c3215)

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This study evaluated a community behavioural intervention in Australia. 250 mothers attended four interactive group sessions involving health messages, behaviour change strategies and group discussion. They also received monthly support via mobile phone text messages. After 12 months, the intervention group showed differences in weight loss and total cholesterol concentration compared to the control group.

Length of publication: 12 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.