Damaged heart genes can be inherited

August 12, 2016

Source: BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: New analysis of congenital heart disease has found affected children often inherit damaging gene variants from their seemingly healthy parents.

The work by Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and partially funded by the British Heart Foundation, sought to discover more about the genetic background of CHD.

CHD affects 1% of people worldwide and around 1.35 million babies each year. It causes problems such as holes in the heart which can need corrective surgery.

The international research, published in Nature Genetics, analysed the protein-coding segments of the genome of 1,900 CHD patients and their parents.

It had previously been thought that many cases might be caused by new genetic mutations which were absent in the parents.

This study found children can instead inherit rare gene variants and it paves the way for affected families to be given clearer advice.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

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Obesity linked to premature death, with greatest effect in men

August 12, 2016

Source: Medical News Today www.medicalnewstoday.com

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A study of 3.9 million adults published in The Lancet finds that being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of premature death. The risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory disease and cancer are all increased. Overall, the excess risk of premature death (before age 70) among those who are overweight or obese is about three times as great in men as in women.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    Medical News Today www.medicalnewstoday.com


Public health cuts ‘could hamper anti-obesity effort’

August 12, 2016

Source: BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

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Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Local councils in England are warning that government cuts to public health funding could hamper their efforts to tackle obesity.

Local Government Association figures show that councils will have spent £505m by 2017 on fighting obesity.

Councils use the money to measure children’s weight at primary school, help people lose weight and offer free or cheaper leisure facilities.

Public health became the responsibility of local authorities in April 2013.

Before that, it was run by the NHS.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    BBC Health News www.bbc.co.uk/news/health


WHO’s recommended level of exercise too low to beat disease – study

August 12, 2016

Source: The Guardian www.theguardian.com

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Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Higher levels of physical activity can achieve bigger reductions in the risk of five common chronic diseases, but only if people engage in levels far above the recommended minimum exertion, a study has suggested.

An analysis of 174 studies found that gardening, household chores and more strenuous activities, when done in sufficient quantities, were strongly associated with a lower risk of stroke and of contracting breast and bowel cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

But researchers from the US and Australia concluded that for the biggest risk reductions, total physical activity per week should be five to seven times the minimum level recommended by the World Health Organisation.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    The Guardian www.theguardian.com