Early gene-editing success holds promise for preventing inherited heart diseases

August 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Scientists have, for the first time, used gene-editing to correct the genetic mutation for a heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).  This new advance could mean that it would be possible to correct the defect at the earliest stage of embryonic development so that the defect would not be passed on to future generations.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation

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New hope to prevent dangerous blood clots found in the legs

August 8, 2017

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: August 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: Common anti-allergy medicines could prove to be effective treatment for potentially fatal blood clots in the legs, according to new research we funded. The findings, published in the journal Circulation Research, may pave the way for new medicines to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) – a health issue that can be a particular problem on long-haul flights or other situations related to long-term immobilization.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


Scan finds heart’s ticking time bombs

August 8, 2017

Source: BBC Health News

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Scientists have developed a new way of scanning the heart that could predict who will have a heart attack.

It has the potential to revolutionise treatment for one of the biggest killers in the world, says the team at the University of Oxford.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: BBC Health News


More older adults ‘may benefit from taking statins,’ study reports

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Nearly all men over 60 and women over 75 eligible for statins, analysis suggests,” The Guardian reports.

This is the finding of a study that aimed to see how many people in England would qualify for statin use if the 2014 NICE guidelines for statin therapy in adults were followed.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Long working week ‘may increase risk of irregular heartbeat’

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Long working days can cause heart problems, study says,” The Guardian reports.

Researchers found people who work 55 or more hours a week had an increased risk of developing a type of irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, where the heart can beat very fast.

Complications of atrial fibrillation include stroke and heart failure.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


Some types of vegetarian diet can raise heart disease risk

August 8, 2017

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A US study found a vegetarian diet based on less healthy food options, such as refined grains, could increase the risk of heart disease.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines