Embrace Mediterranean or Nordic diets to cut disease, WHO says

June 15, 2018

Source: The Guardian

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Date of publication: May 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Britain could lower its rates of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease by embracing Mediterranean- or Nordic-style diets, a major study into the benefits of healthy eating suggests.

A review by the World Health Organization found compelling evidence that both diets reduce the risk of the common diseases, but noted that only 15 out of 53 countries in its European region had measures in place to promote the diets.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: The Guardian

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‘Apple-shaped’ women may have increased heart attack risk

June 15, 2018

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: “Women with apple-shaped bodies are ‘more likely to suffer heart attacks than those who are pear-shaped’,” the Daily Mirror reports, as a new study found a link between increased waist size and heart attack.

Researchers from the University of Oxford and other institutions investigated the links between having increased levels of body fat and the risk of having a heart attack.

They used data from people enrolled in the UK Biobank study, which asked nearly 500,000 adults between the ages of 40 and 69 about their health.

The study found having a bigger waist and having a bigger waist relative to your hips were linked to an increased risk of having a heart attack.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

 


Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use is associated with increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide case–time–control study

March 17, 2017

Source: European Heart Journal

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Study

In a nutshell: Researchers found a link between the potentially fatal heart problem and ibuprofen use, as well as another type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) called diclofenac. A cardiac arrest is a serious emergency where the heart stops pumping blood around the body.

The Danish study looked at 29,000 people who experienced a cardiac arrest, and then at whether these people had taken NSAIDs.

The researchers found the risk of a cardiac arrest was increased by a third for those who took ibuprofen in the 30 days leading up to cardiac arrest.

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Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:  European Heart Journal


Study highlights heart disease risk for pregnant women

December 9, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Pregnant women and those who have recently given birth need to be aware of the symptoms of heart disease, according to a new report from researchers at the University of Oxford.

The Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths report, from MBRRACE-UK, highlighted that two in 100,000 women died in pregnancy or in the early weeks after childbirth from heart disease, which is the leading cause of women dying in pregnancy or the early weeks after childbirth.

The report showed that overall, 8.5 women per 100,000 died during pregnancy or shortly after giving birth, between 2012 and 2014.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


How to manage and reduce stress

December 9, 2016

Source: UK Health Forum

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: Research has shown that stress can sometimes be positive. It makes us more alert and helps us perform better in certain situations. However, stress has only been found as beneficial if it is short-lived. Excessive or prolonged stress can contribute to illness such as heart disease and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

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Acknowledgement: UK Health Forum


New recommendations for overweight people with heart risks

September 3, 2014

Source: Reuters

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The United States Preventive Services Task Force has issued new recommendations for overweight patients who have risk factors for heart disease. These patients should receive intensive behaviour counselling for diet and exercise. Previous studies showed that by attending this form of counselling for up to one year, many health markers were improved and the risk of diabetes was reduced.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: Annals of Internal Medicine, 26th August 2014


Interventions to promote physical activity and dietary lifestyle changes for cardiovascular risk factor reduction

August 13, 2010

Source: Circulation 2010, 122 (4) p. 406-441

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Modest sustained lifestyle changes can reduce cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. However, interventions aimed at dietary patterns, weight reduction and physical activity are often not maintained long-term. This scientific statement by the American Heart Association provides evidence-based recommendations, strategies and guidelines for implementing physical activity and dietary interventions. Implications for policy and future research are also briefly outlined.

Length of publication: 36 pages

Some important notes: You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article. Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: American Heart Association