Do heart attack treatments change depending where you live?

July 14, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: July 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The care that you receive after a heart attack will vary greatly depending on where you live, a 10-year-long study suggested today.

This variation in care was largely due to differences in the delivery of heart attack treatments between hospitals.

The most frequently missed interventions were dietary advice, advice to help people to stop smoking and the prescription of a type of anti-clotting drug known as P2Y12 inhibitors, such as clopidogrel when indicated, which was associated with potentially avoidable deaths.

Some regions are only providing optimal care in just over 10 per cent of cases, the study funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) found.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement:    British Heart Foundation

Advertisements

Blood test breakthrough improves diagnosis of inherited heart conditions

March 14, 2016

Source: British Heart Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

A new genetic test for heart conditions which are passed down through families has been developed by researchers.

The international team of researchers, led by Professor Stuart Cook, in Singapore, Imperial College London and at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre showed that by looking at a particular group of genes they were able to reliably test for all known inherited heart condition genes with one simple blood test. 

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: British Heart Foundation


NHS Health Checks ‘prevented thousands of heart attacks’

February 8, 2016

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:

NHS Health Checks, introduced in 2009, are offered to people aged 40 to 74 years old. They look for risk factors associated with a number of related conditions: heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and some types of dementia.

The researchers looked at how many people took part in the programme. While the uptake was initially relatively low (5.8%), this increased to about a third of those eligible in 2012-13.

It is also encouraging that some of the more vulnerable groups – those who are older and those in the most deprived social group – were most likely to attend the checks.

A proportion of those identified as being at high risk of heart disease in the checks started statins (19.3%) or high blood pressure treatment (8.8%). Extrapolating this data, the researchers estimated that NHS Health Checks prevented around 2,500 cases of major cardiovascular events such as stroke and heart attack over the course of five years.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines


2m study to check if chest scans can cut heart attack risk

April 8, 2015

Source: National Institute for Healthcare Research

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: March 2015

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A trial funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme will examine whether giving cardiac CT scans to patients when they arrive at hospital with chest pain is a cost effective way to improve treatment, save lives and cut unnecessary hospital admissions.

In the UK, around 700,000 patients attend hospital emergency departments each year with chest pains, with many being admitted to hospital for further tests.

Further testing often involves patients being given an angiogram, which looks at the blood flow through the heart to identify any obstructions that could pose a heart attack risk. The angiogram accurately identifies coronary artery obstruction, but involves passing a catheter into the heart and therefore carries significant risks.

The trial will use cardiac CT scans to test patients upon admission to hospital, enabling doctors to look at the blood vessels within the heart and detect abnormalities without the risks associated with an angiogram. Cardiac CT scans are also around an eighth of the cost of an angiogram.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: National Institute for Healthcare Research


Cholesterol and a healthier nation: shared responsibility for better public health

December 14, 2011

Source: Heart UK

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: 13 December 2011

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report makes 8 recommendations to ensure adequate funding for NHS Trusts to implement fully the NHS Health Check programme in order to help prevent early death caused by high cholesterol and other cardiovascular risk factors.

Length of publication: 24 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


NHS Health Checks Ready Reckoner correction

May 11, 2011

Source: NHS Health Check

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: 12 April 2011

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: The original version of the NHS Health Checks Ready Reckoner was published online in March 2011, but a calculation error was subsequently discovered. This has now been corrected and a new version is available to download. Those who previously used the tool to produce estimates based on local population split by age and gender, need to re-run their calculations using the new version.

Length of publication: 1 webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Improvement – Heart


Considerable uncertainty remains in the evidence for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

February 10, 2011

Source: The Cochrane Library

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: 14 January 2011

Publication type: Editorial

In a nutshell: This editorial is written by Carl Heneghan, Director of the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, and Clinical Reader in the Department of Primary Health Care, University of Oxford. It is based on the evidence from two new Cochrane reviews of preventive strategies: multiple risk factor interventions for primary prevention of CHD, and statins for the primary prevention of CVD.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.